Fresh eggs question

janiedoe

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
May 7, 2017
6,278
56,679
1,087
East Texas
I have fresh eggs, when I collect them can I leave them on the counter and if so how long are they good for, or do they need to be refrigerated?
I do not wash eggs and I leave them on the counter for up to 3 weeks with no problem. There are several excellent articles and posts on BYC about egg storage. Some refrigerate, some do not. I don't because I get too many eggs and I do not see the need.
It is really up to you to decide what you are comfortable doing.
Enjoy all those wonderful eggs!
 

Acre4Me

Crossing the Road
Nov 12, 2017
6,555
21,044
867
Western Ohio
Counter is ok for a few weeks. If you wash an egg, must be refrigerated. I have a couple of pullets that seem to sleep in a nest box (not yet laying, so trying to avoid Either the hormone crazed male of same age or top hen) so have been getting some dirty eggs which need to be washed. Otherwise, clean eggs from the nest boxes are fine for the counter unwashed.
 

Katonk

Songster
Apr 4, 2019
99
227
107
Texoma
There's a lot of opinion on what is ok and what isn't. Bloom is wonderful stuff, but there are a few out there that feel that the bloom is not enough at keeping people safe from salmonella. I'm of the thought that that's both true and untrue, as salmonella is in the poop and not in the bloom and a clean looking egg is a safe egg. I'll only wash my eggs if I'm handing them out to someone else or if I can see visible dirt on them, and I keep them in the fridge as soon as I've gotten them because I've gotten eggs before that hatched in my fridge. The babies died because I didn't find them till a few days had passed (I worked overnight out of the home for a few days on rotation). Now logically I know they can't grow into adorable baby chicks even being left on my counter for a few days, and I know they're super fresh unlike the ones I got all those years ago.
But the image sticks.
I put mine in the fridge to ensure the fertilized eggs cannot mature and I keep them there until use. I'm careful not to let shells touch when cracking, and I wash my hands as soon as I'm done cracking and I'm about to cook.
Salmonella sickness sucks.
There's my two cents.
Here's another two because I like to share the wealth.
Govt watches our health. Even if folks feel dead set against cleaning eggs for whatever reason remember that if folks get sick too often it raises a red flag. I always clean and sanitize my eggs when I hand them out because if those people get sick it's not on my flock handling. I don't want any further govt regulation involved with my backyard keeping. And regulation only comes when those in power feel a need to protect us from ourselves. Whatever you choose to do please consider making the cleaning and sanitation of eggs you're intending to gift or sell a rule as part of your flocky love.
Let folks find another reason for their stupidity, keep your flock out of it.
 

Attachments

  • EggCleaning.pdf
    734.7 KB · Views: 3
Last edited:

jvls1942

Free Ranging
12 Years
Oct 16, 2008
13,261
8,809
721
wausau,wisconsin
I wash and refrigerate eggs.
The blume doesn't bother me, but the contamination from the nest I do not like.
as long as my chickens lay every day, I never eat an egg that is more than 3 days old. the rest get sold.
 

Acre4Me

Crossing the Road
Nov 12, 2017
6,555
21,044
867
Western Ohio
as salmonella is in the poop and not in the bloom and a clean looking egg is a safe egg


Salmonella can be present in the poop on the egg as mentioned, but can also be INSIDE the egg because the infection is in the ovaries. So, a very clean egg or a well washed egg could still harbor Salmonella. Luckily, while Salmonella is common, and affects several types of animals, not all chickens have Salmonella.


Link from 2010 with simple explanation of Salmonella:
https://www.livescience.com/10016-salmonella-eggs.html

Key quotes from above link:
Screen Shot 2019-10-02 at 8.16.49 AM.png
Screen Shot 2019-10-02 at 8.16.58 AM.png
Screen Shot 2019-10-02 at 8.17.13 AM.png
 

Attachments

  • image.png
    image.png
    38.6 KB · Views: 1

Katonk

Songster
Apr 4, 2019
99
227
107
Texoma
Salmonella can be present in the poop on the egg as mentioned, but can also be INSIDE the egg because the infection is in the ovaries. So, a very clean egg or a well washed egg could still harbor Salmonella. Luckily, while Salmonella is common, and affects several types of animals, not all chickens have Salmonella.


Link from 2010 with simple explanation of Salmonella:
https://www.livescience.com/10016-salmonella-eggs.html

Key quotes from above link:
View attachment 1923331 View attachment 1923332 View attachment 1923333
Oh man thanks for the info! See now this is why I love this website, so much help offered kindly and freely.
I'll have to Google it but I really appreciate the links, I'm sure I'll find the answer but it's worth asking here first: can you tell if a hen is sick with infection like that?
I would think it's a hard infection to know about unless it's raging, but that's just an uneducated assumption on my part. So she can lay both contaminated and uncontaminated eggs... So that's why there's nuked eggs on the market! Man so much to Google, thank you Acre4Me for that correction my friend, I try very hard to keep my flock healthy and the results on my table nothing but a benefit.
 

Acre4Me

Crossing the Road
Nov 12, 2017
6,555
21,044
867
Western Ohio
Oh man thanks for the info! See now this is why I love this website, so much help offered kindly and freely.
I'll have to Google it but I really appreciate the links, I'm sure I'll find the answer but it's worth asking here first: can you tell if a hen is sick with infection like that?
I would think it's a hard infection to know about unless it's raging, but that's just an uneducated assumption on my part. So she can lay both contaminated and uncontaminated eggs... So that's why there's nuked eggs on the market! Man so much to Google, thank you Acre4Me for that correction my friend, I try very hard to keep my flock healthy and the results on my table nothing but a benefit.

Here is a site worth looking at. Sometimes I find good info.
http://www.poultrydvm.com/

Here is their info on Salmonella. Its more complex than the above article.
http://www.poultrydvm.com/condition/salmonellosis

And, generally a chicken would have to be swabbed and tested to determine if it had Salmonella - you could not determine it by outward appearances.
 

SEPMJR09

Songster
Jul 10, 2019
156
109
118
I do not wash eggs and I leave them on the counter for up to 3 weeks with no problem. There are several excellent articles and posts on BYC about egg storage. Some refrigerate, some do not. I don't because I get too many eggs and I do not see the need.
It is really up to you to decide what you are comfortable doing.
Enjoy all those wonderful eggs!
Thank you so much for the reply and info. I leave them on the counter lol and I do not wash them. We get a ton of eggs, usually eat them within a week or two so they aren’t on the counter long. it’s so fun! The kids love collecting them! Thanks again!
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom