Friendly Silkie flock attacked..Now very scared of us

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by silkiemomma3, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. silkiemomma3

    silkiemomma3 New Egg

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    Oct 28, 2013
    I have a flock of 18 silkies of various colors. We have 6 roosters, but only one is mature enough to crow. He is about a year old. We noticed that we didn't hear him crowing one morning so we go out there and he was gone..only feathers remaining. Our coop is VERY secure. They have a pretty decent sized run caged in by fencing and chicken wire. Also have an indoor area they go into to sleep. Anyways, our flock was VERY friendly. Always ran up to the fence as soon as they saw us coming, always ran inside the coop when we went to collect eggs. But ever since the rooster was taken they are TERRIFIED of us. Won't get near the fence when we're out there, even when we throw corn. That is very unusual of them. Since it is almost halloween, and we live in a very remote place, is it possible that the attack came from a human and that's why they are so scared of us now? Or are they just shaken up by the attack in general? The fence was pulled back a little on the top, but someone could have easily walked in through the coop because the only lock on it is a latch. Even if it wasn't a human, is there any way we can get them to trust us again? They used to be the sweetest things and now they're so scared of us. :(
     
  2. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Sorry about your rooster. How long ago did this happen? Is there a top to the run? Hawks are a problem in a lot of places now and them flying over can really keep chickens spooked. Chickens can react like that to predator attacks, human or otherwise, hiding, scared to come out of the coop, or near anything or anybody else etc, sometimes it will take them awhile to recover. It sounds like they lost the dominant rooster, and they are usually the ones that are bravest and are in the forefront of things making decisions, so your flock is unhappy because its leader is gone also. It may take a little while for the pecking order to settle again and a new rooster to start making decisions. I would just be patient with them and move quietly around them, offer them treats etc, like you were trying to make friends with strange chickens, since they know you they should come around pretty fast again.
     
  3. silkiemomma3

    silkiemomma3 New Egg

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    It happened we think a couple of days ago, we aren't sure on time or anything because we didn't hear any commotion. We just didn't hear him crowing and went out there and he was gone :\ and yes there is a roof on the run. It's very sad. I went out there to get them some cracked corn and they were panicking so badly they were flying into the roof of the coop. Breaks my heart because they used to run right up to me. Poor little babies
     
  4. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Sounds like something really did scare them. Patience and a lot of treats should win back their trust. You haven't had any problems since the first incident have you with anything bothering the coop? If you think it was people probably want to put some sort of lock on the doors and if animals use better wire on the top.
     
  5. DLV58

    DLV58 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry to hear about this ...poor girls....Maybe if you just sit quietly with them for awhile it would help
     
  6. bluebirdnanny

    bluebirdnanny Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd also add to move very slowly and talking in a very soft voice before they ever see you. That is what it took for mine after an attack. Let them stay in the coop for a few days and it took over a week for the rooster to crow again. Then the addition of a few hens brought the rooster around. Now he crows again and seems even more astute at watching over them.
     

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