Frizzle Experiment

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by PoultryPlot, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. PoultryPlot

    PoultryPlot Out Of The Brooder

    I am considering doing an excperement for a special project for an Animal Science Class. I have the birds to do it on Frizzles and I was wondering if it was a pointless study.

    My Plan:
    -Put a Frizzle Rooster over a Smooth Hen
    - Record Chicks that develop Frizzle feathering
    -Put a Smooth Rooster over a Frizzle Hen
    - Record Chicks that develop Frizzle feathering

    See which combination produces more frizzles and if there is a difference.

    I am aware that on average 3/4 of the chick will develop frizzle while the remaining 1/4 will have smooth feathering. I am just curious if it makes a difference which parent is frizzled and which is not.

    Any input would be great!
     
  2. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I think that sounds like a excellent experiment [​IMG]
     
  3. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    With non-frizzle to frizzle (regardless of the direction), it will be about 50/50, not 75/25, that end up frizzled.
     
  4. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    As above stated. It isn't a sex-linked trait.
     
  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Since this is presumably a graded experiment, you would do well to read up on the frizzle gene and also the frizzle modifier gene. Not just in places like BYC, but in published scientific literature. Summarize the information you find, and make predictions based upon your crossings. The only difference between crossing a male frizzle versus a female on is the number of hens he can pass the gene to their eggs. Describe your expected results, then tabulate you actual results. How does or does that not corroborate your anticipated outcome? And what does it tell you?
     

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