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Frizzle, Silkie & d'Uccle youngsters

Discussion in 'Chickens 8 Weeks & Older' started by AprilDrake, Jun 2, 2017.

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  1. AprilDrake

    AprilDrake In the Brooder

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    Apr 26, 2017
    Newcastle
    I have several chickens that were hatched in February/March timeframe and need new homes. All were hand-reared and are used to be held by my 5 year old daughter who holds them daily. That doesn't mean they run up to her (unless she has treats) but they are pretty docile when caught. All were raised together. I just don't have the room for so many cockerels and the hens aren't working with my more dominant birds.

    • You can have a pullet FREE if you take a cock.
    • Cocks free
    • Pullets $10 unless you take a cock
    Stock:
    • 1 platinum d'uccle pullet
    • 1 white d'uccle cockerel
    • 1 ginger-colored frizzle cockerel
    • 1 black-colored frizzle pullet
    • 1 white silkie cockerel
     

    Attached Files:

  2. RoostersAreAwesome

    RoostersAreAwesome Free Ranging

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    Have you considered trying a rooster only flock for the extra cockerels?
     
    MilesFluffybutt likes this.
  3. MilesFluffybutt

    MilesFluffybutt Songster

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    Nov 16, 2016
    Vermont
    Whoa... Can you tell me more about a rooster-only flock? I'm potentially overrun with Silkie roos.
     
  4. RoostersAreAwesome

    RoostersAreAwesome Free Ranging

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    So here are the basics:

    For a rooster flock you need a big enough coop for the roosters to be able to get away from each other. In my rooster flock of 6, I have a few different feeders and waterers so all the roos can have enough food and water. It isn't really necessary, I just like to be safe. I free range my roosters once a week, but on that day keep the hens locked up. You don't have to free range them though.

    Add new roosters at around 3 months of age, and make sure no roosters gang up on them. if a rooster is being bullied wait for a while to see if it goes away. If it doesn't, than remove the bullied roo or bully from the rooster flock. I would separate the bullied/bully in with the hens, so you don't have to get it a new coop.

    I wrote a thread in "Managing Your Flock" if you want to know more. :)
     
    MilesFluffybutt likes this.
  5. MilesFluffybutt

    MilesFluffybutt Songster

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    Vermont
    Perfect. Thank you, RAA. I'll take a peek at the full article tonight after work.
     
  6. RoostersAreAwesome

    RoostersAreAwesome Free Ranging

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    Lol, on the thread the information is a little spread out. :p I'll add some more stuff to the first post, though.
     
    MilesFluffybutt likes this.
  7. WynnFamilyFarms

    WynnFamilyFarms Chirping

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    Mar 4, 2017
    Mississippi
    Where.are you located?
     
  8. MilesFluffybutt

    MilesFluffybutt Songster

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    Nov 16, 2016
    Vermont
    I'm in Northern Vermont - practically on the Canadian border.

    Because I know you're dying to know, I opted against an all-rooster flock, and purchased more hens. I have six Salmon Faverolle hens arriving Wednesday/Thursday from Cackle, and found a local Silkie breeder that has some hens roughly the same age as my current group for sale. PLUS I just heard about a chicken swap being held this weekend AND I vetted a local farm that will take roosters - for breeding stock, not eating. I made sure to check. They'll get their own little coop, some ladies to tend to and all the vitals they can cram into their crop.
     

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