From tool shed to Coop?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by TexasWineGuy, Jul 8, 2019.

  1. TexasWineGuy

    TexasWineGuy Songster

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    Howdy All,

    We (10-year old daughter and I) just got a couple young hens about 2 weeks ago. We were given one of those coop/run kits, approximately 3 x 6'. It's what I would call minimally adequate as far as run square footage.

    I also just finished an 8x8' portable Run that we will attach in the next coupe of days.

    Looking ahead, I'd ultimately like to have 4 hens so we have enough eggs for ourselves and have some to sell to friends and neighbors, however the existing Coop/Run is far too small for more than the 2 we have. Having said that, I'm considering turning this old tool shed into a Coop.

    My biggest question about this potential project is with regards to ventilation. How much do you think I need for this size Coop, with 4 hens, in SW Texas?

    And, how would you suggest I ventilate this thing? 1x2 frame, with cutout, then seal with 1/2" hardware cloth?

    Thoughts?

    TWG
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  2. HenOnAJuneBug

    HenOnAJuneBug Crowing

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    I would leave the doors open (or remove them) and frame out a wall with a door, and cover everything with hardware cloth. Also, you could replace a panel or two with 1/4 or 3/8" plywood, and cut ventilation into that (the 2nd picture shows how I did it). Be aware that these buildings need some kind of awning to block the wind. Here's what I did so you can get some ideas. Maybe I shouldn't have cit holes for ventilation, but whatever. One was free and the other $75.

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  3. penny1960

    penny1960 Boo

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    Perfect idea they do make great coops just make sure of ventilation
     
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  4. TexasWineGuy

    TexasWineGuy Songster

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    HOJB,

    Thanks for the reply. I don't see an awning on yours. Am I missing that?

    Also, since I have quite a few native predators I will need some type of run that is fully enclosed. That's the hardest part of where we live - plenty of critters that would love to snack on the hens.

    The only way could just leave the main doors open (or removed) would be if I could build a run that would enclose the shed also, Or - I build a run and attach it to the shed with a short hallway/door. That darn 1/2 mesh wire is not cheap!

    TWG
     
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  5. PirateGirl

    PirateGirl Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist

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    Yes, I would also consider keeping that whole door/wall open. Maybe make a screen door of sorts that you can lock over it that would keep them safe at night.

    Keep brainstorming other ventilation for other times of the year when the weather might be colder and/or very wet.
     
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  6. HenOnAJuneBug

    HenOnAJuneBug Crowing

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    I didn't have something to keep the wind out until later. Still haven't come up with something I Like. That's why I didn't recommend cutting holes in the metal.
     
  7. TexasWineGuy

    TexasWineGuy Songster

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    All,

    If I wanted to frame a couple cheap windows into this shed, how do I get around the metal wall's pleating ribs?

    If the surface was flat, some 2x4's here and there would work, but I'm not sure how to frame a window with this type of geometries. Thoughts?

    TWG
     
  8. HenOnAJuneBug

    HenOnAJuneBug Crowing

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    I would remove a panel and replace with 3/8" plywood. That's what I did, and it works really well. The metal walls are too thin to work with.
     
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  9. TexasWineGuy

    TexasWineGuy Songster

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    Minor update. I got the shed elevated and removed what was left of the wood floor. Some toads, worms and a snake were present. Floor ribs seem to be in better shape than expected considering the entire bottom of the shed has basically been below dirt level for years.

    I was thinking about coating the bottom 6" of the shed exterior with Black Jack #57, but I did confirm with Black Jack that it CANNOT be painted over. I'm thinking that the Sammich maker might not like a white shed with a black stripe on the bottom right outside our living room sliding glass door. We shall see.

    Current plan is to replace the floor, then coat the inside walls (~6") and the entire floor with Black Jack #57. I also did look at a few windows at Lowe's today to get some ideas. Should not be too hard to frame a couple windows on the side walls for some good light and ventilation.

    One step at a time...

    TWG
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  10. TexasWineGuy

    TexasWineGuy Songster

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    Did a boatload of Metal Primer over the last 2 days and just shot the first coat of Rustoleum semi-gloss top coat. Used a $35 airless paint gun from Amazon, and worth every penny. Second coat tomorrow.

    @jthornton

    Some questions for the more experienced:

    The phase II plan is to use this shed for the walk-in coop, then build a permanent 8 x 16' run that will attach directly to the Coop via a small cut door in either the Coop side, or back wall.

    My question pertains to the front of the Coop (shed). It's got a 56" opening that is covered by the 2 sliding doors. I'd like to keep that opening "open" for ventilation and light purposes, but I don't know if I want to permanently remove the metal sliding doors, or keep them open and build a wood-framed insert that contains a hinged door for us to walk in. Might I want to keep the sliding doors just in case, I temporarily wanted to "close" the entire front?

    What are your thoughts with regards to the front of this soon-to-be Coop?

    Also, I do plan to frame in at least 2 windows also for more light and ventilation.

    Thanks for any suggestions.

    TWG

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