Frost bite on roosters

Agathe

Songster
Jun 1, 2021
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We've had some cold weather and my two roosters have gotten frostbites. It doesn't look too bad, but for now I locked them in the coop with a heating lamp. The heating lamp doesn't seem to make it warm in there, but it stays a few degrees above freezing. This morning I'm noticing the frostbites seem a little worse despite keeping them out of the frost, still not bad though. We are supposed to have warmer weather coming and by later today or tomorrow won't have frost for a while. The question is if they need it even warmer than above freezing to avoid further damage? I haven't treated them with anything yet but do monitor. They seem to eat and drink like normal. I would prefer letting them go outside again as soon as it keeps above freezing, just cause they'll get bored in the coop for too long.

The frost bites are on one spike on both roosters' combs. One yesterday had some discolouring of his wattle (I suspect because he makes more of a mess when he drinks, I've noticed him shaking water off), the other didn't have this yesterday but do today. Haven't seen any damage on the feet. Can't take photos as the heating lamp I'm using at the moment has red light. I do have a ceramic bulb too if that's better for them.
 
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DobieLover

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We've had some cold weather and my two roosters have gotten frostbites. It doesn't look too bad, but for now I locked them in the coop with a heating lamp. The heating lamp doesn't seem to make it warm in there, but it stays a few degrees above freezing. This morning I'm noticing the frostbites seem a little worse despite keeping them out of the frost, still not bad though. We are supposed to have warmer weather coming and by later today or tomorrow won't have frost for a while. The question is if they need it even warmer than above freezing to avoid further damage? I haven't treated them with anything yet but do monitor. They seem to eat and drink like normal. I would prefer letting them go outside again as soon as it keeps above freezing, just cause they'll get bored in the coop for too long.

The frost bites are on one spike on both roosters' combs. One yesterday had some discolouring of his wattle (I suspect because he makes more of a mess when he drinks, I've noticed him shaking water off), the other didn't have this yesterday but do today. Haven't seen any damage on the feet. Can't take photos as the heating lamp I'm using at the moment has red light. I do have a ceramic bulb too if that's better for them.
Please post pictures of their combs.
Locking them in the coop that caused the frostbite is not a good idea,
Most frostbite is caused by a severe lack of ventilation in the coop that prevents moisture from escaping so it instead condenses on the combs and freezes.
Can you also post pictures of the coop?
Putting a heat source in the coop is a major fire hazard and should be avoided at all costs.
Providing water in chest height heated waterers or horizontal nipple waterers will minimize/prevent wattles getting wet when they drink.
Where in general are you located in the world? You should update your profile with that information so it appears which each post you make.
 

Agathe

Songster
Jun 1, 2021
102
127
103
Please post pictures of their combs.
Locking them in the coop that caused the frostbite is not a good idea,
Most frostbite is caused by a severe lack of ventilation in the coop that prevents moisture from escaping so it instead condenses on the combs and freezes.
Can you also post pictures of the coop?
Putting a heat source in the coop is a major fire hazard and should be avoided at all costs.
Providing water in chest height heated waterers or horizontal nipple waterers will minimize/prevent wattles getting wet when they drink.
Where in general are you located in the world? You should update your profile with that information so it appears which each post you make.
My question was really if I can let them out again once the temperature goes above freezing. The heat lamp is a temporary solution that will most likely be taken down tomorrow morning. The coop is well ventilated but they've been outside all day at daytime. I live on the coast of Norway so the air is generally moist here which makes it feel colder than it really is. I suspect this is the cause behind the frost bite, not the coop.
 

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