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Frost bite

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by gummybear61, Jan 1, 2017.

  1. gummybear61

    gummybear61 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think my roo has bad frost bite his crown points tips are black and looking bad a few scabby ones
    . How can I help him til I get him to a vet... we have been putting Vaseline on him to help through winter but I'm not sure that helping him.... help please some do look like their stabbing it did not look bad a few days ago we been putting neosporin on it but just to help with scabbing
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2017
  2. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    I think you have done all you can and the vet won't be able to much more. I've read some folks use neosporin to aid in healing and then Vaseline as a preventative for future frost bites. I think the black tips will just scab off and not cause permaren't damage. Good luck to you!
     
  3. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Can you post some pictures of your coop, including ventilation in relation to roost position? At this point the damage is done, and there is little a vet can do. He just needs time to heal. To prevent any more frostbite, you need to assess the cause. Is it because your coop isn't adequately ventilated? Are the roosts in a draft?
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I have several young roosters with frost bite as you describe. They are not being treated and points will be lost. Generally health issues associated with such are minimal if cause involves birds exposed to a lot of wind as with classical frost bite. If caused by high humidity then birds may be a little more stressed.
     
  5. gummybear61

    gummybear61 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i will send some.fotos in the morning for better lighting. im thinking ventilation as well i keep most windows closed by where they sleep to avoid draft but 1 window is proped open a bit but it may not be enough. i pretty sure there are no drafts thhe coop is pretty well insulated. although during day small broader/coop door is open so they have access to go in and out. we do have a heated water feeder that may be causing extra moisture as well with the cold. he doesnt stay out much he dont seem in lain but im concerned about infection ( i know my girls dont pick on him he pretty hi in the pecking order where he has them in there place. he is also so big/tall as im sure most hi breads are)
     
  6. Vlfie

    Vlfie Out Of The Brooder

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    With any type of frost bite, the vascular area has been compromised. either by constriction of the blood vessels or by rapidly warming the area which uses up the oxygen thus causing the tissue to die.
    Many times the blacken area will either fall off or under the scab the body will be able to revascularize the area. One of the issues is that the scab becomes hard and the compression can necrose more of the underlying good tissue. On people using a skin softener thin ( vasoline) will help the scab to be soft so that it can fall off once the skin underneath heals, like on toes. I'm not sure how practical it would be to maintain a Rooster Crown unless he is a prize. For I'm sure his hens wound't mind a little gray on their Rooster. :)
     
  7. gummybear61

    gummybear61 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    should i keep him inside... i did last night but im afraid to warp his cold weather adjustment by keeping him in the warm house ... and yes i just noticed i was away for a few days he was fine when i left my friend only followed my feeding watwring and other minor instructions. he wasnt sure what to look for in health since he has no lets of his own.
     
  8. BeachMomma

    BeachMomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You've done the best with treating him with the vaseline, I wouldn't bother with the vet tbh. Heated waterers in the coop overnight can cause moisture build up that can lead to frost bite.
    Our roo got frostbite a few years ago because he would get water before going into the coop and it froze within a short time with it being around 5 degrees. He was fine after a few days by just monitoring him.

    Edit:
    Leave him in the coop, just have the vaseline on him. (Unless his comb is bleeding and he's being picked on.)
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2017
  9. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Open up more ventilation, particularly by the floor and at the roof. Cool air will come in and move the stale, humid air up and out of the coop at night. It helps to have air moving passively past where they roost...this is not a draft but a passive air flow. Resist the temptation to close up the coop as temps go below freezing.

    Castor Oil may help restore blood flow to those tips if you get it on there in a timely fashion and will help that area heal. You can get CO at any pharmacy and even at Dollar General. Just massage it lightly into his comb, be gentle over the blackened areas but make sure they get a thick coat of it. This will protect better and longer than Vaseline, while acting as an anti-inflammatory, an antimocrobial and will help restore healthy skin to that area. In short, it eases the pain, brings blood to the area to speed healing, works as an antibacterial, and a moisture barrier to protect against further humidity affecting the skin.

    I agree with skipping the vet visit....there's really nothing they can do but charge you money for something you can take care of at home.
     
  10. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Closing things up too much, and keeping a heated water source in the coop is a recipe for frostbite. Improve ventilation above roosting height. Water inside the coop is not needed. They don't drink once they go to roost. Bring it inside in the evening to prevent it freezing solid overnight.
     

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