frost bite

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by adorable, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    I was just wondering. My ducks loves to be outside no matter of weather. Can they get frost bite on there beaks and feet. What do i have to watch for. What is the coldest that you would let them out. ?
     
  2. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    Found here: http://www.longshadowfarms.com/winter.html

    You do not need to be concerned about water freezing on the ducks feathers. That just shows how well insulated they are. If they were loosing body heat, the water wouldn't freeze. Consider what down jackets are made of. Waterfowl have built in down jackets that they wear year round. Even in below zero temperatures, ducks will want to swim. This actually helps keep their feathers in good condition and allows them to better survive the cold temps. Swimming water is not necessary EVERY DAY. You can provide it 2-3 times per week and just provide drinking water other days. Just remember on sub-zero days to check them often or dump the water when they're done to prevent them from freezing into the pan or to the ground around the pan. Ducks can die from struggling to get free when they are frozen in and can lose limbs from frostbite this way.

    I've read elsewhere that ducks feet can freeze to the ground during the winter. Though I don't know how common it is.
     
  3. pishposh

    pishposh Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 13, 2009
    westminster, md
    also, watch out for water freezing near the buckets. it can get very slippery and dangerous for the ducks as they can slip.
     
  4. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    Thanks. I have a heat pail that i can use. But the thing is i dont want to do this in the barn. Because they are so messy. Plus they love the outdoors.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. pardygwyn

    pardygwyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 14, 2009
    As long as they have reliable water access, I don't think you'll have a problem. The only time I ever did was when we had to crack ice just to give the ducks drinking water - their feathers get bedraggled fast without it.
     
  6. keeperofthehearth

    keeperofthehearth Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ohhh, nice chocolate Scovies. You will have to watch for frostbite on the Scovies faces & feet. They can handle quite a bit of cold but I'd make sure they can get their feet off the snow & ice and out of the wind. Being South American ducks they have adapted well to colder climates but I have seen postings where they did get frostbite. I know I saw at least one post fm Alaska where they lost their Scovy after she got frostbite really bad on her feet and gangreen set in. Remember Scovies don't have as good of a oil coat a mallard derived ducks so if they do take a bath in freezing temp's be sure they can get somewhere out of the wind/cold to dry off. Better safe than sorry, I say.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2009
  7. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    thanks again. That was what i was wondering. So it is best when the weather gets bad.To keep them in.
     
  8. froggie71

    froggie71 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 18, 2009
    Shamong, NJ
    Pic from last winter. No frost bite. They actually liked walking in the snow. Got this pic when I was trying to get a funny pic to enter into a contest.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. keeperofthehearth

    keeperofthehearth Chillin' With My Peeps

    It's going to be your call, all said and done. You know your weather better, what YOU are comfortable with in regards to your pets/Scovies, how much room they have if they are shut indoors etc. Critters don't always know what is best for themselves. They also go by what they are used to much of the time. I bought my Scovies late last winter and they were used to being outside. They looked miserable standing out in our inclimate FEB. weather but chose to until they got used to the idea that they COULD stay in the nice warm shed and snuggle down into the shavings & that took a little coaxing on my part. They didn't have a nice warm shed before and much more limited space. Anyhow, once they discovered they were allowed the comfort of the shed they chose it. If you choose to let them stay outside in bad weather just keep a watch on them and check them over for any sign of health issues. Some individual Scovies may weather the winter extremes better than others... just because they can doesn't mean that it's necessarily good for them. If this is your first winter with Scovy then you can always err on the side of caution for awhile. [​IMG]
     
  10. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 9, 2008
    Hahira, GA
    Yep, your call, but they can handle the hardest freezes you can throw at them. They are built for it, with all the fat, air filled down, and tight woven feathers. They actually like it.
    Do watch their feet, they are the only vulnerable part, just because of the dampness they usually create in their pens,they can freeze in place in their sleep, if at all possible, open water is the best for them in the winter, as they will stay on it and have no problems, This can be achieved, even in Ontario, by using aerators in your ponds to keep the water surface moving..
    But, in the end, your call
     

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