Frost Bite

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Norsegod127, Feb 15, 2015.

  1. Norsegod127

    Norsegod127 New Egg

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    Feb 14, 2015
    Hello,
    I have 5 Barred Rocks, first off I got them because they were winter hardy chickens. Where I like in the North East weve been getting single digits and negative degree weather. Crappy thing is...it looks like its here to stay for the next 10 days. On my chickens feet they have a few black spots, not that severe, but noticable. Also on the tip of their comb the have a little white or black. Nothing major. But me being me I worry for them, and I feel bad for them just sitting out their in this cold. I did put a tarp around the coop that covers half of the west and east side, and all of the north side because of the crazy amount of wind Ive been getting. Is their anything else that I should do? And looking at the pictures online of chicken frostbite really makes me want to stop it before it gets to that (whole leg is black).
    Thanks and this is my first winter with chickens. (next year I already have plans to make it better, just need to make it past this winter)
     
  2. steny03

    steny03 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've rubbed petroleum jelly on their combs and wattles with success. Not sure about their feet.

    You'll have to reapply the jelly every couple days.
     
  3. Sonya9

    Sonya9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I live in Georgia where the temps are obviously much warmer, it does break 30 degrees during the winter though.

    I slather vaseline on the combs at night as the bantam rooster comb is susceptible to frostbite even with our milder temps. They also have a coop with wood flooring and solid draft proof walls to keep the elements OUT.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2015
  4. Sonya9

    Sonya9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also having flat smooth wooden roosting poles so they can lay on their feet is good, the feathers help insulate.
     
  5. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Ventilation it the key. With a well ventilated coop only the largest combed birds get a touch of frost in these northern climate winters. As for feet they squat down on them when roosting so they shouldn't get frost. When in run if ice I toss down a thin layer of hay which they appreciate.
     
  6. Norsegod127

    Norsegod127 New Egg

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    Feb 14, 2015
    Yeah I have a coop with a 2x4 going across. So I shouldnt really worry about their feet if they have this? Or can i put vaseline on their feet/legs? And Ill add some to their combs once the 40 mph winds go down, waay to cold for me to go outside right now.
     
  7. Sonya9

    Sonya9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I keep a jar of vaseline in the coop and put it on at night when I lock up, it is dark and the birds are already perched. Trying to do it during the day would be near impossible but maybe your birds are tamer. If they already have damage be very gentle as rough handling will hurt.

    Frost bite will kill the tips of their combs, the peaks fall off and end up rounded.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2015

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