Frostbite?! Help please

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by coopobot, Dec 15, 2016.

  1. coopobot

    coopobot Just Hatched

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    This is my first year with chickens, im pretty sure one of them has frost bite. I have attached some photos to show you.

    Everywhere seems to be ok apart from the combe of my white chicken. I think she is a Longhorn of some sort.

    Her combe is quite long, and i think has always hung to the side. She still lays eggs on a regular basis and is eatting and drinking. She often jumps onto the roof of the coop and is running around as normal so she does not seem in pain or upset.

    As you can see from the pictures of the coop and run. There isnt any way of adding extra ventilation, which is something i considered. The laying box / area is the only part that lifts open. Although i always keep this shut as i dont want drafts going through. And the run is a mud pit due to the rain.

    I generally give them a full clean out ever 7-14 days. Which includes scrapping up all the wet mud that has built up.

    It was freezing for a week or so, about 2-3 weeks back. But its slightly more mild now. Maybe 5-10 degrees celius each day.

    Help please!?...

    Frostbite??
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Other chicken, ok i think?
    [​IMG]

    Run and coop
    [​IMG]

    How the coop is normally left. Day and night.
    [​IMG]

    Only possible way of adding ventilation.
    [​IMG]



    All help, cures, remedies and advice greatly accepted.
    Thank you all in advance.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Yes, unfortunately, it looks a little frostbitten on the tips. The comb tips may eventually become rounded off after it heals. In what state or country do you live? The large-combed chickens get it the worst, and humidity combined with cold temps make it more common. Be sure and keep adding dry pine shavings on top to dry out any wet bedding. Here are a couple of good links to read about frostbite:
    http://articles.extension.org/pages/70255/frostbite-in-chickens
    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2013/12/frostbit-in-backyard-chickens-causes.html
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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  4. coopobot

    coopobot Just Hatched

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    Im in the midlands, England.

    Thanks for the links. I will have a read.

    From seeing the set up i have. Can u see any quick tips that might help? Other than the pine leafs.

    Thank you.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Some people drill holes into the peaks of their coops, cover them with wire fencing, and this can allow air to ventilate overhead from one end to the other. You can deal with mud by adding sand, leaves, pine needles or whatever is handy, and try to slope the dirt where it will drain.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    Poop is moisture, also their breath is moisture.......Sand is great for sucking out the moisture in Coops.....Clean daily with a kitty litter scoop.....Vaseline works great on Combs and wattles to prevent frost bite.........Adding more Shavings over wet poop will not get rid of the moisture....Moisture rises.....Drill top vent holes on your Coop.....



    Cheers!
     
  7. coopobot

    coopobot Just Hatched

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    Thank you both.

    I worried that as its a small coop, holes might create a draft rather than help with ventilation.

    I will sort holes out in the morning and keep on top of cleaning out the poop more often.
     
  8. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    If you drill the holes high enough, drafts won't be an issue.
     

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