frostbite on comb

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by minksroost, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. minksroost

    minksroost Out Of The Brooder

    74
    1
    43
    Dec 27, 2012
    Richmond, Virginia
    Ok. New to chickens. went to the coop this morning and one of my roos had dried blood on the back of his head/neck. and a little down his side on feathers. scared me at first but then saw a crusty spot on the back of his comb and a few other small dot spots. I don't see and injury so I'm can say with relative certainty that it came from his comb. So I out neosporin on it. now the big question is the dried blood. I put him in a crate in the coop until I could do some research but wondered if thus will cause the other rooster to peck at him or will both the hen and rooster peck at him because if the blood? or is he fine out with them. the other roosters comb and waddle look beautiful bright red. thoughts? before you say it I know I can't have one Hen and two roos . the roos grew up together but they just started pecking at the hen so I know I have to get on roo out. We are trying to just get 5 more hens so the can hopefully live in harmony. but the timing is bad right now with winter and the need to separate New birds. enough history. ideas suggestions on the comb and does he need to be created? Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2013
  2. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Hi again! Well, unless the comb tip is really bad, I doubt the other two will peck at the area because it's bloody/red...generally dries blackish. But if the other roo did it, then there's a good chance that it'll happen again just because they're squabbling.

    I've had hens do this to other hens - bossing someone off "their" roost area. Combs must really bleed, because I've gone out more than once to find what looked like a CSI crime scene...lol. Spray on the wall/dropping board and drops. But generally the comb wound is barely noticeable.

    If you keep BluKote on hand, you can spray a little on the comb to camouflage the red area, but it's probably not needed. If you find your boy injured again, you may have to crate or pen one of them separately overnight. You might add a roost away from but about on level with where their current roost is so the boys can get away from one another.

    Although comb injuries bleed a lot, they're generally not serious and tend to heal quickly.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2013
  3. minksroost

    minksroost Out Of The Brooder

    74
    1
    43
    Dec 27, 2012
    Richmond, Virginia
    Hello again teach1rus! Comb isn't really bad. Just a few little specks of black and the one that is a bit larger but still not that big right at the end of his comb where it meets the back of his head. It is dried now. But seems seems weird that is would cause a sort of dusting of red on his feathers just below. From shaking his head you think? It was early so I can't imagine it was from pecking. I know I need to separate them but they really haven't been "fighting". Just both pestering my hen.

    OMG I'm so glad it didn't look like a crime scene. I would have had the big one right then. I"m a total fretter!

    I don't have BluKote but will get it for sure.

    Thanks so much for your input - I feel a bit better. Might go let them all out. Assume their feet will be ok in the snow as we have about 2 inches in the coop run. But they can always get under the house. Do you make your chickens stay in when there is snow on the ground? Again, thining of frostbite.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by