chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,048
4,144
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
Quote:

I was wondering if this was the start of frostbite. And if it is what can I do to treat it?
Thanks

It is more the result of frost bite than the start of it. Use this as a learning moment and carefully watch this lobe of the comb. Although this is a very small example, I think that your rooster will lose the tip of that lobe of his comb.
 

critterkeeper25

Songster
6 Years
Jun 16, 2014
219
36
131
South Jersey - down on the farm.
Yep. That's frostbite all right. I have read on here to put neosporin on it which will keep infection at bay and prevent further frostbite. I have also read to make sure to keep your chicken warm to prevent further damage from frostbite. Our chickens got the same way last winter. We were told that our coop probably wasn't ventilated enough, so we added some vents to the soffits of the coop to keep the humidity down inside. They can also get frostbite on their wattles from having water drip down them when they drink and then it freezes. Do you have your waterer inside your coop? If you have an automatic chicken door in your coop which will allow them to go outside as soon as it is day break, you would be better off leaving the water outside to reduce the humidity in the coop.

Also, there is also the option of heating your coop. There are aguments for and against that. We ended up heating our coop when we had 6 hens affected by frostbite last year. It was suggested to bring them inside our house to keep them warm. But frankly, I didn't want 6 chickens in my home. Plus the cats probably would terrorize them the entire time.

Hope this helps. Good luck with your chickens.
 

kidfarmer

Chirping
5 Years
Mar 29, 2015
129
4
99
Massachusetts
Thanks! Helped a lot I ended up putting bag balm on her comb. They use it on cows utters when they get chapped and cold so I thought it could work! I had a little water pan inside but I just recently had removed it. I'm up pretty early to let them out around 6:30-6:45 is when I open the doors for them to come out and the doors are open all day. I am planning on just leaving the water outside now since I noticed it. Also i plan on adding a vent on the opposite side of where they roost letting the humidity out.
 
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kidfarmer

Chirping
5 Years
Mar 29, 2015
129
4
99
Massachusetts
Quote:


It is more the result of frost bite than the start of it. Use this as a learning moment and carefully watch this lobe of the comb. Although this is a very small example, I think that your rooster will lose the tip of that lobe of his comb.
It is actually a hen, she just has a very large comb compared to my other ones.
 

oldhenlikesdogs

Suffering Succotash
BYC Staff
Premium Feather Member
Jul 16, 2015
42,524
69,248
1,402
Wisconsin
Most larger combed birds in colder climates will eventually have some frostbite on the combs, it heals up fine on it's own and makes less trouble the next year because there's less comb. Good ventilation will keep it at bay in average temperature, correct waterers for those with large wattles, and when it gets really cold there's not much you can do, I personally can't coat everyone's combs, it's just a part of keeping certain breeds.
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,048
4,144
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
Most larger combed birds in colder climates will eventually have some frostbite on the combs, it heals up fine on it's own and makes less trouble the next year because there's less comb. Good ventilation will keep it at bay in average temperature, correct waterers for those with large wattles, and when it gets really cold there's not much you can do, I personally can't coat everyone's combs, it's just a part of keeping certain breeds.
Or you could dub him, or her and never worry about it again.

"I dub thee Queen Brown Leghorn"
 

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