1. LittleMissCountry

    LittleMissCountry Songster

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    I have been checking my four chickens every few days for mites, since two of them have been losing feathers. Thankfully it just seems to be a mini molt.

    However, tonight I noticed one of them had a black mark on her foot, and at first thought it was just mud. It has been raining and snowing a LOT lately. It didn't come off. My daughter and I brought her in and gave her feet a bath in room temp water, and I am wondering if it is frostbite. I feel awful, because I hadn't noticed earlier. It has been so muddy for weeks, so their feet are always dirty.
    Pics below.
    It hasn't been that cold...the coldest has been 25 degrees a few nights ago, but with all the wet weather, I guess it could happen. We brought them all in and cleaned them up, and she is the only one affected. The coop has enough ventilation, but it has been impossibly rainy/snowy lately. The ground has been mucky for weeks now.
    Since they are all wet tonight, they are sleeping in the guest bathroom tub tonight, on a blanket.
    There was a black spot on the bottom of each foot as well. One turned out to be a clump of dirt. I didn't rub the other one in case it was frostbite or bumblefoot, as it didn't come off easily. She is walking fine and not favoring the foot. Sorry the picture quality isn't good...she doesn't like to be held down and I couldn't get it to focus up close. I will try to get a better picture of the bottom of the foot tomorrow.
     

    Attached Files:

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  2. ChickNanny13

    ChickNanny13 Crossing the Road

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    The one under her foot does look like bumble foot, the ones on top of her toes looks to be pecked? Are they on the same foot or separate? I maybe wrong :pop waiting to see what others have to say.
     
  3. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Chicken tender

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    It doesn't look like frostbite to me. Generally frost bite causes the whole toe or foot to turn black, not just a few scales.
     
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  4. LittleMissCountry

    LittleMissCountry Songster

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    It is on the same foot. If it is bumblefoot, I read that when it is black it is the last stage, and is very painful. I have not seen her limping or favoring it at all. Should I treat it as if it is bumblefoot?
     
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  5. LittleMissCountry

    LittleMissCountry Songster

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    Yeah, I googled frostbite on chickens feet and nothing looked like hers. Would it be an injury? Pecking?
     
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  6. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Chicken tender

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    Could be bruising, or even staining. If it has bumble foot on that foot it could be from the infection. I'm not sure if I would treat or not without limping.

    @Wyorp Rock , what do you think?
     
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  7. ChickNanny13

    ChickNanny13 Crossing the Road

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    I've had Wyandottes & BOs with scabs under their feet, no limping nor swelling or reddening. Didn't do anything, most talked of surgery but I'm to chicken, then found this article. Never tried it as I ended up rehoming them due to family situation. I presently have 4BOs again, they are confined so I keep their area thick with shavings & pick up any rocks/pebbles they dig up. Found a small scab under one's foot, I left it alone, it's been about a month & a half, the other day I saw it was lifting so I picked at it and it fell off. Nice & pink under it :fl Will be keeping an eye one their feet.

    IF you decide to treat, wear gloves ....

    December 13, 2015 by Melissa
    Supplies for Non-surgical Bumblefoot Treatment, Tilly’s Nest/FB
    Here is what you will need to help your chickens with bumblefoot:
    • Bath Towel
    • Clean kitchen sink
    • Gloves
    • Epsom Salt
    • Neosporin or Duoderm Gel
    • Vetericyn
    • Duoderm GFC (available online or at your local medical supply store)
    • Vet Wrap
    • Medical Tape
    Treatment Plan for Chickens with Bumblefoot
    Fill the sink with about a gallon of warm water and add Epsom salt to create a bath that even you would like to soak in.

    Then wrap your chicken in the bath towel; being sure to wrap the wings securely and leaving her feet out. The towel will help keep her calm and also allow you to do the treatment all alone without any helpers.

    Next soak your chicken’s feet in the Epsom salt bath for 10 minutes. This helps to loosen up the plug that had built up. The plug is actually comprised of dead tissue and other exudate from inside the foot that develops on the pad of the foot when it attempts to heal. The black “scab” is called eschar. In people sometimes we leave them alone and other times we soften the eschar and remove it gently in order to speed up the healing process.

    In bumblefoot, the eschar can vary in size. They are hard but soften beautifully with a nice good soaking. This allows you to work on the plug in a non-surgical manner without this use of a scapel.


    A view from above- the bigger one is pencil eraser sized.
    Next with a gloved hand gently try to work the plug from around the edges of the eschar on the bottom of your chicken’s foot. If it is not ready do not force it. You don’t want it to bleed. Simply return to soaking for another 5-10 minutes. Give it time and be patient.
    The plug should release with a bit of manipulation. It should not bleed, but if it does, don’t worry. Apply a bit of pressure to the bottom of the foot for a few minutes. It will stop.

    The goal is to have to plug release naturally without much trauma because right underneath the plug is healthy tissue already working to heal the foot. When that bed of healthy tissue is damaged or cut into you are actually taking steps backwards in the body’s healing process.

    The underside of the kernels. No blood just nasty soft tissue from the body trying to heal itself. The tissue on the foot pad looks nice and healthy.
    Once the plug is removed, dry the foot completely and spray with Vetericyn. Allow it to air dry. While waiting give your girl some love. She is going to feel much better now.
    Next apply a bit of Neosporin to the bottom of the foot pad. Instead of this you can also use Duoderm Gel to fill the wound. Next, cut a circle to fit the wound from the Duoderm GFC, center it on the wound to completely cover the wound edges and then wrap the foot pad with vet wrap. The vet wrap should be snug but tight. You don’t want to affect the circulation and blood flow to the foot. So the toes should be warm even once you apply the vet wrap. Put a bit of medical tape over the end to prevent it from coming undone. Phew, you did it!

    Be sure to disinfect your work area and sink with a 10% bleach solution after you are done.

    This girl should be separated for a bit from the others during healing. A diet of layer pellets is good, but supplement her with high protein snacks like meal worms and sunflower seeds to help her heal faster. Add some vitamins and electrolytes to the water too. Birds that are deficient in Vitamin A are more prone to developing bumblefoot. For her makeshift home, do not allow her to roost until healed and have a thick layer of pine shavings so her feet are comforted when walking. If she must roost, add a layer of padding by wrapping the roosts in towels to soften where she sits.

    Change the bandage in the same fashion every few days or sooner as needed. Because of the Duoderm GFC you can change the bandage less frequently (you can even leave it on for a week if the bandages remain intact and the foot is showing no signs of infection). Also monitor for signs and symptoms of infection that can include warmth and redness at the site, foul smelling drainage from the wound and an overall sick appearance. If this occurs, a visit to the vet is probably necessary for some oral antibiotics and possible surgical wound treatment.

    There are many reasons why chickens can get bumblefoot- from ill fitting roosts, small wounds, “splinter” like cuts, scrapes and trauma. It can also be from lack of Vitamin A and Niacin in the diet. For Lucy, I believe that it probably started with a cut or splinter during free-ranging.

    For mild cases of pododermatitis, changing to a softer substrate, exercise to increase blood supply to the foot, soaking the affected foot in warm water, and the use of keratin softeners (petrolatum jelly, A & D ointment, e.g.) may be all that's needed. The foot can also be soaked in a dilute chlorhexidine or iodine solution which are available in your local feed store. If there's a break in the skin, then soaking in a solution called Tricide-Neo with an antibiotic can speed healing Dr Michael Salkin
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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    I agree with @ChickNanny13 that it looks like a bumblefoot and some missing or pecked scales on the leg.
     
  9. LittleMissCountry

    LittleMissCountry Songster

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    Oh boy...I was hoping I wouldn't have to deal with bumblefoot. I he epsom salt, and neosporin, but I guess I need to pick up some more supplies tomorrow. I will try to get a better picture tomorrow morning as well. Should I let her go back to the coop tomorrow or keep her in until it is healed. Wouldn't it just get infected again since everything is still wet and muddy outside?
     
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  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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