Frostbite

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Alethea, Dec 15, 2011.

  1. Alethea

    Alethea Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2011
    Flora has frostbite on her beautiful (largest in the flock) comb. Greta has a little spot, too. I'd been told not to worry about the cold here (Oregon) and that frostbite occurs due to lack of ventillation in the coop. Our coop is very airy. It is a converted wood store, about 60sq. ft. for three chickens and, in addition to the official ventillation with the chicken wire and hardware cloth, there are lots of holes and cracks.

    I've put some shea butter (don't have bag balm or vaseline) on all their combs. Should I do it regularly until the weather warms? Is it preventive as well as curative?
     
  2. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    Quote:I'm sorry you have this problem.

    Frostbite & frostnip are caused by cold. The dampness can exacerbate the tissue damage

    The coating of the comb and waddles help keep water/damp from collecting on the flesh, so you won't have ice in contact with flesh.

    Here's some info about it:

    http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-treat-frostbite-in-chickens.html

    http://www.ehow.co.uk/about_6612305_chickens-frostbite.html

    http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2602413/how_to_treat_chickens_suffering_from.html?cat=53

    Good luck,

    Imp
     
  3. Dutchess

    Dutchess Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:If you have a bunch of holes and cracks in your coop you may have a draft blowing over them while they roost at night. Check for drafts around their roosts and block up any cracks or holes that are causing any wind to blow in onto them. I believe that will help. That's the only reason I can come up with that would be causing frostbite in those temps. Usually, it happens during the worst months of the winter. January/February when temps around here (Maine) get to the single digits and below zero at least one week during January.
    As for the shea butter, I think it's okay for them but it soaks into their skin where vaseline or bag balm coat and dont soak in. It leaves a coating to protect from the wind. Good luck! I hope this helps.
     
  4. Alethea

    Alethea Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2011
    Quote:I'm sorry you have this problem.

    Frostbite & frostnip are caused by cold. The dampness can exacerbate the tissue damage

    The coating of the comb and waddles help keep water/damp from collecting on the flesh, so you won't have ice in contact with flesh.

    Here's some info about it:

    http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-treat-frostbite-in-chickens.html

    http://www.ehow.co.uk/about_6612305_chickens-frostbite.html

    http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2602413/how_to_treat_chickens_suffering_from.html?cat=53

    Good luck,

    Imp

    Thank you very much.
     
  5. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are you sure it's frostbite? Fowl pox and pecking can leave black spots on a comb, too.
     
  6. Alethea

    Alethea Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2011
    Quote:If you have a bunch of holes and cracks in your coop you may have a draft blowing over them while they roost at night. Check for drafts around their roosts and block up any cracks or holes that are causing any wind to blow in onto them. I believe that will help. That's the only reason I can come up with that would be causing frostbite in those temps. Usually, it happens during the worst months of the winter. January/February when temps around here (Maine) get to the single digits and below zero at least one week during January.
    As for the shea butter, I think it's okay for them but it soaks into their skin where vaseline or bag balm coat and dont soak in. It leaves a coating to protect from the wind. Good luck! I hope this helps.

    Thank you. I'll pick up some vaseline or bag balm. I know there is a crack near where they roost. We'll get on it. Fortunately, we have a break in the weather at the moment.
     
  7. Alethea

    Alethea Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2011
    Quote:Thank you. I don't know anything about fowl pox and will look into it. They're not pecking. They are broodmates and get along remarkably well.
     
  8. Dutchess

    Dutchess Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:If you have a bunch of holes and cracks in your coop you may have a draft blowing over them while they roost at night. Check for drafts around their roosts and block up any cracks or holes that are causing any wind to blow in onto them. I believe that will help. That's the only reason I can come up with that would be causing frostbite in those temps. Usually, it happens during the worst months of the winter. January/February when temps around here (Maine) get to the single digits and below zero at least one week during January.
    As for the shea butter, I think it's okay for them but it soaks into their skin where vaseline or bag balm coat and dont soak in. It leaves a coating to protect from the wind. Good luck! I hope this helps.

    Thank you. I'll pick up some vaseline or bag balm. I know there is a crack near where they roost. We'll get on it. Fortunately, we have a break in the weather at the moment.

    Good luck with sealing up the cracks, I truely hope that helps! As for the weather, here in Maine we're getting spoiled too with temps in the thirties and fourties. Usually it's in the 20's this time of year!
     
  9. Ksane

    Ksane Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:That's what I was going to ask also. Fowl Pox looks like black scabs.
     
  10. Alethea

    Alethea Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2011
    I found a picture of fowl pox and it is not what they have. I'm grateful for this. I'll go ahead with the vaseline/bag balm and sealing the crack near their roost and hope for the best. Thank you for all your help.
     

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