frostbite?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Izzymoon, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. Izzymoon

    Izzymoon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 19, 2012
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    Hi, What are the signs? My girls have a greyish tint on the tips of their combs, is this frostbite? They seem otherwise healthy and not going through molt or anything?

    thanks for any advice
    ( I tried to get a photo but they wouldn't sit still)
     
  2. willowbranchfarm

    willowbranchfarm Chicken Boots

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    Sounds like frostbite. Try putting some neosporin on the combs.
     
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  3. Izzymoon

    Izzymoon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    here's a photo i just took. She's one of my big black stars and a sweetie. Will the neosporin keep it from happening again?

    [​IMG]
     
  4. willowbranchfarm

    willowbranchfarm Chicken Boots

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    Doesn't look like frostbite, but like she got pecked. No it will just help with healing and comfort.
     
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  5. Izzymoon

    Izzymoon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 19, 2012
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    oh! yes i have seen them grab each others combs...interesting i didn't know that was part of the pecking order...thanks for the help
     
  6. Bird biz

    Bird biz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Please help. My Leghorn has dark on her face as if frostbite. I have read the posts on ventilation but before that I had sealed off the coop as it has been from -5 to 13 degrees the last few days. She had not developed her comb yet and it looks fine. I upset my husband by rushing the chickens into the house to sleep. I don't know if the Leghorn is ok....
     
  7. aggiemae

    aggiemae Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Salem Oregon
    A chickens face has lots of circulation so it's probably not frostbite and if it is she will most likely recover completely.

    But your coop need to be vented no matter how cold it is outside. I know it's hard to believe but it's true. As long as your coop is draft free you can have the underside of your eves completely opened for venting. Damp is far more dangerous to chickens than cold but if you are worried about the cold adding a few inches of bedding to the bottom of the coop will raise the temperature a few degrees. You can also fill some gallon jugs with hot water and put them in the coop right when the hens go up to the roosts for the night. The warm air will rise and warm them for a bit as the water cools and they will keep each other plenty warm for the rest of the night.

    You should also consider buying a thermometer so you can monitor the temperature in your coop. It's probably warmer than you think. Mount it at the height of the roost and check it in the morning right around when the hens jump off the roost to leave the coop in the morning is a good time to get an accurate reading.


    Frost bite isn't painful but the black areas will probably fall off but don't pick at them or remove them since they are protecting the skin underneath. You can some triple antibiotic ointment on her waddles and comb but don't clog the little vents on her beak. Or you could just oil her and your other hens combs waddles, legs and feet once a week to help protect them from from the damp. I like vit E oil but really any oil, even cooking oil, will do.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013

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