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frostbite?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Renee572, Oct 29, 2014.

  1. Renee572

    Renee572 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I didn't think it got cold enough here last night but maybe my girls did? What do I do for it besides putting a heating lamp out there tonight?
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    Last edited: Oct 29, 2014
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Could it be a peck injury or some other injury from something sharp in the coop? Frostbite is pretty rare in October, more common during sub-zero weather. It usually gets the tips of the comb first.
     
  3. Renee572

    Renee572 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I suppose it could be. I'm still fairly new to this whole chicken thing. I haven't noticed any of the other girls picking on these 2 though. My girls are generally pretty mellow, I don't even know the pecking order, that's how mellow they are. But with that being said I do live in AZ and it only got to 57 last night which I wouldn't think was cold. However we don't have a completely closed in coop... we have a run/coop where 3 sides are plywood and the front is just chicken wire.

    Do you think I should put anything on the black areas? Should I bother putting a heat lamp out in the coop tonight in case they did get too cold? I recently lost a hen at the beginning of September and I just don't really want to make a mistake and lose another due to my lack of knowledge.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    The combs will heal without anything, if it is peck marks. Iodine or betadine can be used if you want. I would go through the chicken area, and look for any sharp objects where they could get cut by flying into things. Chickens do not need heat lamps unless it gets 20 below zero F or lower. People in Alaska, Canada, and Finland are here on BYC, and don't heat their coops unless it gets way down to 20-30 below. Respiratory diseases may be caused by using heat in coops that promote panting and open-mouth breathing, along with no overhead ventilation to get rid of excess humidity. Chickens keep warm just fine without heat, and it's a lot safer not using it to prevent coop fires.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2014
  5. Renee572

    Renee572 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thanks.
     
  6. darkbrahmamama

    darkbrahmamama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I wouldn't use heat lamps. They can do more harm than good. I used bag balm & Vaseline on my roosters combs & wattles last winter. There were many nights it dropped below 0 last winter.
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Several chickens got severe burns last year from heat lamps being placed too low. When they fall asleep, they don't realize their burning. More people in the last few years lost their chickens and coops in terrible fires. Some were due to heat lamps, and some due to faulty electrical cords. Chickens survive well in cold areas with a closed up coop free of drafts, no heat source, and ventilation high up near the ceiling to let out excess humidity. 3 inch wide roosts will allow them to roost covering their feet to protect them from frostbite. During the daytime they will still like to get out for fresh air in a covered run.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2014
  8. ochochicas

    ochochicas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Today I noticed my new rooster has black ends on the tips of his comb. It has been in the mid 40s at night, but it still looks like frostbite. Is there anything else it could be?
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    . Could you post a close up picture of the comb? That temperature would not be low enough to cause frostbite. Pecking wounds and fowl pox make cause dark spots, and sometimes parts of the comb can become darkened temporarily.
     
  10. newchickincoop

    newchickincoop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That how mine started and it was fowl pox - dry.. :-(
     

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