1. cornwellkidd

    cornwellkidd Chillin' With My Peeps

    14
    0
    60
    Dec 12, 2012
    I have a rooster that has frostbite on his comb & waddles both are a gray color. He is as mean as it get so putting any thing on him is not real. If he lives to spring he may become soup. I can't go into the chicken yard without a fight. He great with the hens and does his job so that's why he is still here. Any ideas Thanks Cornwellkidd
     
  2. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

    17,494
    2,147
    456
    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    Tonight, pull him off the roost and learn how to handle him. Learn how to withstand the bites and nor respond to them. He will quickly stop biting. Then gently look at the frostbitten areas. Post picture of them if you can. Feel for differences in temperature that correspond to differences in coloration.

    The winter has not really gotten started yet so tougher times to come with respect to temperature if winter proves typical. Keep him in good food and hopefully him molt is near completion so he can better withstand the cold.

    Show a picture of roost setup and where birds go to avoid cold.
     
  3. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,316
    442
    221
    Apr 12, 2013
    Boulder, Colorado
    If he's too mean to handle and medicate, than he's on his own. It will probably die and fall off but it won't kill him.

    If he's too mean for you to go in the pen, than he needs to go. It doesn't matter how well he does his job, he's a liability. You don't want to be hatching his chicks either because they can have his disposition as well. Find another rooster that is both easy to work with and does his job. They are out there. Try a different breed is you have to. It's only a matter of time before he injures you or someone else.
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

    17,494
    2,147
    456
    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    No chicken is too mean to handle off the roost. You have to learn how to do it, otherwise get out of chickens.
     
  5. cornwellkidd

    cornwellkidd Chillin' With My Peeps

    14
    0
    60
    Dec 12, 2012
    I have gone and picked up every hen I have off the roost but the rooster will jump of fly off at you. This rooster beat a dog up that went after the hens is why I keep him. he will fight to the death He just don't peck. If you can get behind he it not to bad but when you walk in the coop he turns and faces you on the roost or not.
     
  6. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,650
    186
    186
    Jan 27, 2013
    Northern Wisconsin
    I'd try to grab him up a few times while wearing a pair of work gloves and long sleeved shirt to protect yourself from getting scratched up too badly, if he is still mean after a couple times of handling him I would kill him. If he gets the hint that your the boss and lightens up his attitude then I might let him around for awhile. I tend to agree that a mean rooster isn't good to have around, I wouldn't want to pass on those genes either and hatching a batch of chicks is the only reason I keep a rooster, so his prospects wouldn't be too good around my place.

    As far as frostbite goes, try to do what you can to minimize dampness in the coop. I have issues with wattles freezing on roosters as they dangle them in the waterer when they drink then they freeze. Had a NH red last year with a frostbit comb, he lost all the tips of his comb and it healed into a big smooth topped comb by spring. Lots of ventilation is the key. If I build another coop it will be more an open air design to allow for as much ventilation is possible while blocking the majority of the prevailing winter wind.
     
  7. cornwellkidd

    cornwellkidd Chillin' With My Peeps

    14
    0
    60
    Dec 12, 2012
    Thanks for the advise. we have been a little cold this fall 2 nights down to 5 below so the bad stuff has not come yet this spring I will turn him into soup. I open the coop every day if they come out or not. The hens seem to be fine so far. This started out as a class project for the Grandkids and keep getting better and bigger. It looks like in the spring oldest Grandson has a Bee project I will get from the school will see how that goes. I said no to goats so far.
     
  8. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,650
    186
    186
    Jan 27, 2013
    Northern Wisconsin
    The wife wants goats too. We have had that cold here as well so far no problems. I didn't have much problem with frostbite last year even in the extreme cold just that one rooster got it and I think his problem was that he was fighting with my barred ROC rooster and getting his comb bloodied which lead to the frostbite
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2014
  9. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

    17,494
    2,147
    456
    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri


    For the medical concern, go after him after dark while he is on the roost. Keep lights off and quietly approach him with minimal use of light. Gently grasp him by the legs with one hand and if need be support his breast. He may peck and flop a bit so get a firm but not overly tight grip. As you bring him to your chest, hold him low so if he does make mad stab at your face he will not be able to reach it. Position him so his body is supported by your horizontally held forearm with hand of same arm restraining his legs with your fingers grasping his heels / shanks above the spurs. With sassy roosters or when handling a lot I like to wear a sweatshirt so bites directed at at your upper arm and forearm do not hurt so much. If he bites, then do nothing and take it. He will calm down. Then take him into a better lighted location where biting may briefly resume before again settling down. Then begin working your hands up to his head so you can get him to move it where you can see the frostbite afflicted areas.


    Does this man-killer have spurs?
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    28,989
    2,982
    471
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Inexpensive Eveready Energizer headlamps can be useful when approaching chickens in the coop on the roost at night. Most of them have various light settings and mine has a red light setting which allows me to sneak up on roosters. I grab them with both hands around the upper legs. This is the only time I feel comfortable worming or doing any type of care on roosters. Here is a link to show you the headlamp which are easily found at Lowes, Walmart, and Home Depot: http://www.amazon.com/Energizer-Fin...33000&sr=8-9&keywords=led+headlamp+flashlight
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by