Frostbitten combs-what can I do?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by wischickenlover, Dec 12, 2007.

  1. wischickenlover

    wischickenlover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 5, 2007
    Ladysmith, WI
    I feel like the worst chicken mama in the world right now. Two of my roos that hatched last summer have frostbitten combs! It does get very cold here, but our coop in enclosed enough, that usually the body heat from our 64 chickens keeps the coop fairly tolerable. We only heat it when it gets extremely cold at night. I checked the girls and my other two roos, and their combs are fine. Just my two youngest (mille fleur banties) that have this problem. I feel awful-they had such gorgeous combs! I'm almost in tears here. I know the damage is done, but what can I do for them now? Any advice will be appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Tiffany
     
  2. Crazy4Chicks

    Crazy4Chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 20, 2007
    Glendale, AZ
    i hope someone gives you an awswer soon - I am having the same poblem here with my little banty roo - the only thing I have done so far is put neosporin on the black spots and at night I have been putting chap-stick on it hoping the beeswax will help.

    Good luck

    Julie
     
  3. Smitty's Farm

    Smitty's Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 24, 2007
    St Clair County, Il
    You may want to post this in the emergency sect. It's my first winter with chickens so I've been worried about the same thing. I don't know what to do if damage is already done. Maybe bring them inside where it is warm. Next cold snap coat their combs and wattles with vasaline to help protect them. I hope someone with more knowledge responds. You are not a bad chicken mama. Good luck and keep us posted.
     
  4. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
    Treat the frostbitten combs as you would a burn... depending on the extent of the damage the areas may need to be treated with neosporin.
     
  5. wischickenlover

    wischickenlover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 5, 2007
    Ladysmith, WI
    OK, I guess I will try the neosporin and the vaseline tonight when they go to roost.....but why only those two out of all the chickens? Just thought that was kind of strange.
     
  6. SandraChick

    SandraChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Are they the ones with the largest combs?

    Often, those with larger combs will get it wet while drinking...then it freezes. Vasoline will help...but the real problem is the water. Anyway you can modify the waterer so they can't touch the water with their combs?

    Sandra
     
  7. SHELLY

    SHELLY Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 7, 2007
    Southwest Missouri
    I have read about the vasaline several times while getting ready for winter. I've been wanting to ask this question...

    How often do you need to apply it?[​IMG]
     
  8. wischickenlover

    wischickenlover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 5, 2007
    Ladysmith, WI
    No, actually, they aren't the ones with the largest comes-strangely enough. I just can't figure it out. We have a standard BR roo, but he doesn't have any frostbite-just the two banty roos. Weird indeed
     
  9. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
    A common reason for frostbite is that the combs have gotten water on them somehow... perhaps from the waterer... the exposure of the water on the combs to the frigid temps will cause the frostbite.
     
  10. mosier

    mosier Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 27, 2007
    Madison, Wisconsin
    How can you tell if a comb is frostbitten? And how low of temps should it be to use vasoline on their combs? Mine three hens have been down to -3F temps and seem to be fine....but maybe I'm missing something.
     

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