Full blooded cochin or no?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by whitney556, Feb 5, 2015.

  1. whitney556

    whitney556 Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]We bought chicks from a guy who raised australorps, buff orpingtons, and cochins. When I looked up pictures of cochins I didn't see any colored up like her, and she also doesn't look as fluffy. Could she be mixed with something else? I still think she's really pretty, I'm just curious! :) This picture is a couple of weeks old, and she has fluffed out a little more but still doesn't look as fluffy as the ones I seen.
     
  2. RogerTheChicken

    RogerTheChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She might be full blooded, she is a color called self blue or lavender, she seems very young also
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2015
  3. RogerTheChicken

    RogerTheChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
    Not my birds
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2015
  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    She looks like a hatchery-quality Splash Cochin to me. Or, she could be a Cochin mix. Not all Cochins are very fluffy, especially if they're not bred for show.
     
  5. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    If she has a straight comb, she's probably pure bred. However, simply being pure bred doesn't mean a bird (or any animal) is a good representative of that breed. That's why we use the term hatchery quality in the chicken world, it's the equivalent of pet quality in the dog world.
     
  6. HighStreetCoop

    HighStreetCoop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    +1
     
  7. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    In the poultry world, "pure bred" or "full blooded" is quite different than the dog or other mammalian breed worlds. There, they use a stud book and pedigree. In the poultry world no such thing exists. No pedigree is important at all, or only of some conversational interest perhaps.

    The genotype are the genes that are in the bird. But, what counts in the poultry world is the phenotype. That which we see. Period.

    So, a bird is said to be This Breed or That Breed only when it looks like the breed as described in the Standard and depicted by the artists hired for producing the Standard Book, like the famous A O Schilling drawings and paintings, for example.

    So for a bird to be a good example of the breed, it has to look like the breed, regardless of it's lineage and bloodline. Hope that helps.
     
  8. emma p

    emma p Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What does her comb look like? From the picture it looks like she is a mix of something else and Cochin.
     
  9. whitney556

    whitney556 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the replies! She's around 5 months old now, she may have been a little over 4 months when I took this picture. Was going to try and get a better pic but it was too dark by the time I got home. As for her comb, I don't really know what straight comb means (I'm new to the world of chickens so I'm still learning what all these new terms mean :) ) but she still barely has any comb at all. She does look pretty similar to the ones that Roger posted in color though.
     
  10. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Agreed.
     

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