galvanized storage can divider?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by adventureben, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. adventureben

    adventureben Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 26, 2010
    I have a large galvanized metal trash can I use for storing feed. When I fill it with a 50 lb. bag of feed its less than half full. I'm thinking of adding a vertical divider to be able to store feed and scratch in the same container. Has anyone done this... is it a good idea? My thought was to use 1/4 in plywood but I'm open to suggestions.
     
  2. Psak9Sports

    Psak9Sports Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 29, 2010
    Annapolis, Maryland
    Plywood would work. However, I would try to find something that would not absorb moisture, would remain dry and not allow for bugs to make homes in it.

    With that being said, this is the perfect time of year to salvage some coroplast from the sides of the road, it only grows there about once every 2 years or so. (The plastic stuff that election signs are typically made of, this stuff is great for all kinds of things around the coop...)

    Cut it to size (can be done with a good pair of scissors..) and wha-la... divider... If you let one side get more then 25% less feed or scratch, you will probally have a problem with the coroplast bending, i would take some 2x2's and attach the coroplast to it running horizontal (3 would prob be good depending on the height of the trash can...)

    I use 5 kitchen sized trash cans with spring assisted lids to sort my feed and other consumables...

    *Edited @2114 07NOV2010 for spelling.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2010
  3. adventureben

    adventureben Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 26, 2010
    Thanks for the reply and the good idea. Since we only have four chickens I think one trash can will suffice. I ended up using some leftover OSB board that I treated with lindseed oil to try and prevent problems with moisture and insects. The finished product will easily hold 1.5 bags of mash and a bag of scratch. The interior dimensions of my can were fairly easy to measure and the tapered cut was easy to make with just a circular saw and a straight edge. A picture of the finished product is included.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. RIBill

    RIBill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 7, 2010
    I have the non-divided version. I leave the feed in its bag. That leaves the other half for a bag of scratch, a bag of oyster shell and a bag of grit, plus the scoop. The metal can provides great protection against pests, but isn't completely waterproof. I lined the barel with a black plastic yard bag. The galvanized can fits perfectly inside a contractor-grade plastic barrel.
     

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