Gapeworm - is there relapse?? Maybe did not treat enough? Help

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by girlsrule, May 18, 2011.

  1. girlsrule

    girlsrule Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG][​IMG]2 year old hen started "gurggling, sneezing, coughing" last week. She also sounded "hoarse". Egg laying had stopped 2 weeks prior. Otherwise no physical symptoms, looked fine. After two days two other 2 year olds were also sneezing coughing and doing strange movements with heads and a 6 week old chick was doing the same. I guessed at gapeworm as all my girls free range. Six days ago I dosed all the adults with Safeguard liquid 3ccs right down the throat, and mixed the same in the 6 week old's water. Everyone seems to improve greatly. The original hen is now very liquid sounding again - could this be a relapse of gapeworm, does this happen??? I couldn't find any reference in the posts to it being a thing that comes back so quickly - should I have givin more safeguard???? Any help would be great - hate for them all to start again!!!
     
  2. girlsrule

    girlsrule Out Of The Brooder

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    Sorry - Bumping myself
     
  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:Were they eating and drinking normally?
     
  4. girlsrule

    girlsrule Out Of The Brooder

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    They are at this time. When it began, the more affected ones were not very interested in eating. They are eating now - only one has the real gurggling, the others are either just shaking their heads a little too much, or sneezing more than seems normal. Also they seems slightly "off", just not acting quite as usual, not chatty, not running to me every time they see me, just kinda "whateverish".
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    If they had gapeworm...they wouldnt be able to swallow anything. They would quickly die from suffocation. I think you're dealing with a chronic respiratory disease (CRD) rather than gapeworm. However, there's a way you can check and see if they have gapeworm and would require 2 people to do this. You'll need someone to hold your chicken while you do this. Get a Q-tip and stick it one inch down her throat and gently swab her throat, then remove the Q-tip. If you see a red in color "Y" shaped worm on the Q-tip, that's gapeworm....then you'd need to re-treat with safeguard.
    For a CRD you can use tylan 50 injectable orally. Oral dosage for large hens is 3/4cc, standard size is 1/2cc, smaller hens is 1/4cc. Dose once a day for 5-7 days. Keep in mind that antibiotics only mask the symptons and dont cure the disease. They will be carriers, therefore you must have a closed flock....nothing in, nothing out, no exceptions. Your only other option would be to cull.
     
  6. girlsrule

    girlsrule Out Of The Brooder

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    Hmmm I've been starting to suspect that. We did the q-tip thing at the beginning and saw a small red speck, but...........nothing to impressive. Oh well, I guess these 8 will be chilling out with us with no new friends. Is there any harm to treating with the Tylan if it is not resp.? I hate not being 100% sure, but hate the thought of dead chickens more. Should I treat all, or just the ones with progressively worse symptoms? Of course my kids favorite EE Lilly is the sickest one!!!! Thanks so much for responding to my post - we have been really lucky and never had sick chickens before this - we went to a petting zoo 2 weeks ago, and now I am highly suspicous I brought this to my girls [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:Since you wormed them 6 days ago, it's always good to follow up with a second worming to kill any larva that made it through the first worming, regardless if they had gapeworm or not. Reworm them on the 10th day (in 4 days) using the same dosage of safeguard liquid. In the meantime, go ahead and get the tylan 50. The small red speck is kinda concerning, could be a piece of gapeworm. Make sure ALL your chickens are rewormed. As far as the petting zoo is concerned...there are some CRD that can be transmitted directly and indirectly, so it is possible transmission couldve happen like that, or even by wild birds.ETA: Since yall went to the petting zoo 2 weeks ago, the incubation period fits in the time frame for a CRD..., but they vary, depending which one it is...just for your info.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2011
  8. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    gurggling, sneezing, coughing" last week. She also sounded "hoarse".

    This doesn't sound like Gapeworm.
    Gapeworm

    Syngamus trachea, a nematode worm parasite of chickens, Turkeys, Pheasants, and other game and ornamental birds occurring worldwide. Infection is by the oral route with earthworms, slugs and snails acting as transfer hosts but the life cycle may also be direct, by ingestion of embryonated egg or L3. There is an 18-20 day prepatent period. The condition is seen more commonly in poultry on free range where ground may be contaminated by wild birds e.g. from rookeries.


    Symptoms:

    Gasping.
    Dyspnoea.
    Head shaking.
    Loss of appetite and condition.

    Post-mortem lesions

    Tracheitis.
    Presence of worms, paired parasites up to 2 cm long.

    Treatments:

    Ivomec
    Flubendazole in feed.
    levamisole

    Sounds more like CRD.

    CRD

    Chronic Respiratory Disease

    If CRD is common in your area, you can use medicated chick starter to help them from not getting it, or vaccinate with LS-50. If you do have it, you can either allow it to run its course, and cull birds that can't get over this on their own, or treat with the medications listed below to assist them in recovering. Keep this in mind, if you decide to medicate, you may be allowing your birds to NOT develop a natural immunity. If you allow them to deal with the problem on their own, and they get better quickly, they will have some degree of natural immunity, which will make your flock stronger in the long run. Either way, birds that can't get over the symptoms that CRD produces should be culled, or at the very least, not used as brood stock.
    Causes

    Mycoplasma Gallisepticum Bacteria infection.


    Symptoms

    Rattle in the chest while breathing. (Sometimes the rattle doesn't show up until the birds are on the roost in the evening, and that is the best time to check for this condition.)
    Bubbles in the eye.
    Runny nose.
    Coughing or sneezing.

    Note: Not all symptoms need be present to have CRD. Symptoms may return from tissue damage to the lungs during stress, even after they have recovered from the initial infection.

    Treatments

    Tylan
    Gallimycin
    Baytril
    LS-50

    Prevention

    Chicks that are exposed to these carrier birds may develop a natural immunity to CRD.


    WARNING

    Do NOT consume eggs from treated birds until at least 7 days from the end of treatments.


    Additional Information

    Mycoplasmosis (CRD, Air sac, Sinusitis)

    Organisms in the genus Mycoplasma are a significant cause of respiratory disease in poultry. Of the numerous species of Mycoplasma that have been isolated from domestic poultry, three are of known significance. Mycoplasma gallisepticum is associated with chronic respiratory disease (CRD)/air sac syndrome in chickens and turkeys and infectious sinusitis of turkeys; Mycoplasma meleagridis is associated with airsacculitis in turkeys; and Mycoplasma synoviae is the cause of infectious synovitis in chickens and turkeys.

    Chronic respiratory disease (CRD), air sac syndrome and infectious sinusitis of turkeys have a common cause. CRD was first recognized as a chronic but mild respiratory disease of adult chickens. It reduced egg production but caused little or no mortality. Afterward, a condition known as "air sac disease" became a problem in young birds. It caused high mortality in some flocks. Many birds became stunted, feed efficiency was reduced, and many fowl were rejected as unfit for human consumption when processed.

    Infectious sinusitis in turkeys produces a sinus swelling under the eye as well as an inflammation of respiratory organs. It is a chronic disease adversely affecting growth and feed conversion. It may also cause significant mortality in young poults.

    A peculiar bacterial-like organism known as Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is common to all three conditions. CRD and sinusitis in turkeys are caused by a pure MG infections while the air sac syndrome is caused by an infection of MG in combination with E. coli. These conditions are triggered by acute respiratory infections such as Newcastle disease or infectious bronchitis.

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is widespread and affects many species of birds. Eradication programs have reduced the incidence in recent years. It is primarily spread through the egg. Infected hens transmit organisms and the chick or poult is infected when it hatches. Organisms may also be transmitted by direct contact with infected or carrier birds.

    The true CRD produces slight respiratory symptoms such as coughing, sneezing and a nasal discharge. In the air sac syndrome there is an extensive involvement of the entire respiratory system. The air sacs are often cloudy and contain large amounts of exudate. Affected birds become droopy, feed consumption decreases and there is a rapid loss of body weight.

    Infectious sinusitis in turkeys occurs in two forms. When the "upper" form is present, there is only a swelling of the sinus under the eye. In the "lower" form, the lungs and air sacs are involved. The air sacs become cloudy and may contain large amounts of exudate. Both forms of the disease are usually present in the flock and frequently are present in the same bird.

    Diagnosis of either condition must be based on flock history, symptoms and lesions. Blood tests are useful in determining whether a flock is infected.

    The answer to the MG problem in both chickens and turkeys is eradication of the disease organisms. This goal has been achieved in commercial breeding flocks with voluntary programs conducted by the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) and National Turkey Improvement Plan (NTIP). The treatment of CRD, air sac syndrome and the lower form of infectious sinusitis is not considered satisfactory. Many antibiotics have been used with varying success. Whether to give treatment is a decision that must be made on each flock based on economic factors. If treatment is attempted, give high levels of one of the broad spectrum antibiotics (Tylan, Gallimycin, Baytril) either in feed, drinking water or by injections. The "upper"; form of infectious sinusitis can be treated with success by injecting antibiotics into the swollen sinus cavity.


    Chris​
     

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