Gapeworm Treatment In Guinea Fowl Question

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by BennieAnTheJets, Jan 29, 2017.

  1. BennieAnTheJets

    BennieAnTheJets Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 4, 2016
    Virginia, USA
    Hi all,

    Thanks so much for being there!

    I did search threads but want to make sure about the translation of the dose, so would love to get your help to confirm this.

    My questions:

    1) how many cc to dose of Safeguard for Goats (100 mg/mL) suspension per bird?

    a) I think I need 20 mg / kg in the beak for 5 days in a row?

    b) 1 mL = 1cc? is that right? So for a 3 lbs. adult Guinea Fowl, 0.3 cc of the Safeguard for goats? My vet prescribed 0.8 cc for 5 days once for a hen who was weighed at the vet's, for gapeworm- I don't recall her weight - maybe he was using 50 mg/kg? He also said he did not recommend treating asymptomatic birds/the flock, because of toxicity - maybe this is due to the higher dose? What is your experience/opinion?


    2) how often to worm them with this wormer / any other wormer? catching them 5 days in a row sure is a lot of stress for them and me - they are not tame - but I will do it if I have to - one post said every 3 months? is that right? We do have a gapeworm problem / infestation here, it seems. I almost lost one hen to it who lost her voice and showed infection of the lungs on x-ray. We treated with several antibiotics and she made it, but I am not keen to repeat that experience. I now got one prematurely emaciated bird I am force feeding every day - may be gapeworm as well. :(

    Any and all help much appreciated!

    Thanks, Bennie
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2017
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    To treat gapeworm in poultry, I would give 1/4 ml per pound of fenbendazole 10% (SafeGuard or Panacur) for 5 days in a row, which will get gapeworm and capillary worm, both hard to treat. That would be 3/4 ml or 0.75 ml or cc. Worm eggs will remain in the soil, and it would be difficult to completely remove them. It would be best to take in a few fresh droppings to get checked by your vet every so often. Depending on the conditions, some treat for worms once, twice, or even 4 times a year. Be sure that you are actually seeing gapeworm with a fecal test, since most respiratory diseases can also cause gaping or gasping.
     
  3. BennieAnTheJets

    BennieAnTheJets Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 4, 2016
    Virginia, USA
    Thank you so much, Eggcessive!

    I have been dragging my feet on this - but need to do it!

    Got a scale to weigh them and hopefully will apply the correct dose and help everyone, rather than hurt anything.

    I am kind'a afraid of that since my vet said not to treat if they are asymptomatic, but with 27 I really can't tell - some definitely have something and since I almost lost a hen to this and she recovered with the Fenbendazole, I think it is better to treat them.

    sigh

    Have any of you had a toxic reaction at 0.75 ml for 5 days?
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Casportpony has several threads on deworming. From what I understand, fenbendazole is one of the safest dewormers. There is an egg withdrawal time from the last dose of 14 days. But I would get some droppings checked for gapeworm before tackling the great task of worming 27 birds for 5 straight days.
     

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