Gasping 9-week-old

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by trumpeting_angel, Jun 24, 2019.

  1. trumpeting_angel

    trumpeting_angel Crowing

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    Hello - My flock of four moved into the new coop last night. They are eating, although not as much as usual. They did enjoy some scratch that I put on the roosts, hoping they would get the hint. They are in a (mostly) plywood coop, with pine shavings from the same bale they've had throughout their life in the brooder. Same feed. I fed them two small cucumber plants (extras) last night and a slug I found in the garden.

    My GL Wyandotte is a bit smaller than the others, has been for weeks. They are all nine weeks old. Last night it looked like she had something caught in her throat; she gasped a bit and shook her head. Then it appeared she headed for the water (but I don't know for certain) and I assumed all was well. This evening I see her gasping, her throat moving very fast, and a bit of head shaking.

    I saw a cecal poop (I thought) today that was brown and liquid.

    As I watched the flock, it looked like two others breathed with their mouths open. Neither looks distressed, or are extending their neck and sort of pulsating like the GLW.

    I'm reluctant to go down and pick them up to compare crops, etc., but I will if I have to. They are still pretty skittish and frightened of me since the big move.

    What info should I post here? I've been scouring the gasping threads, but most seem to have other upper respiratory symptoms, or weepy eyes, or something else.

    Thanks. Worried mom.
     
  2. RhodeIslandRed5

    RhodeIslandRed5 Songster

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    Can you post a picture of the poo? Could be coccidiosis. I'd administer Corid ASAP. IMG_20190613_174008.jpg
     
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  3. trumpeting_angel

    trumpeting_angel Crowing

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    The poop has gotten buried. I just went down to look at them again. A couple of others had their mouths open for a minute, but otherwise everything was normal! They came over to see if I brought treats. After I left they decided to eat in case I’d brought something good (I didn’t bring anything.)

    Okay. I know I’m a worry wort, but this is crazy. They all look fine.

    :idunno
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2019
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  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Before you even see pic of poop?!

    The plant might have got caught in the throat....was it spiny? Have they had access to properly sized granite grit?
    Panting can also be caused by heat and/or stress...
    ....takes some time to learn when to act and when to wait it out.
     
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  5. trumpeting_angel

    trumpeting_angel Crowing

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    The cucumber plant was a bit prickly. I was just reading an article on Coccidiosis and the poo pictures did not look like my poop. Mine was a uniform yellowish brown.

    At this visit I opened the door to the coop and sat down beside them. They were much calmer. Truly, Callie (the grasper) looked completely fine.

    It was hot today, but the ventilation is good in there and it didn’t feel warm. When I saw her gasping was the warmest part of the day, though.

    I’m keeping an eye on them. Thanks for responding!
     
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  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Guessing that was the issue....I try to be careful giving them loose(not growing out of the ground) plant matter they can gorge on it and/or it's too long to get down easily.
     
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  7. trumpeting_angel

    trumpeting_angel Crowing

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    Thanks, @aart. The only thing mine gorge on is scrambled eggs and yogurt! They don’t get much, though. Oh, and they demolish the handful of sod they get now and then.

    They ate the leaves and the flowers, but left the stems. I’ll be more careful. As always, your help is appreciated!
     

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