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Genetics question......

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the Standard o' started by bauerdog, Jul 1, 2016.

  1. bauerdog

    bauerdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am curious about the final feather color of chicks from a specific combo. I had a blue Marans rooster with gold leakage. He came from a blue cuckoo roo over a blue marans. He covered a sapphire hen (crested cream legbar over a white leghorn). I let a broody hatch out 2 of her eggs. The first chick hatched out black with a very sharp head spot and the Marans fluff on the legs. Does this indicate a sexable chick? Both parents probably have a cuckoo gene......would a head spot mean a male or female? And should I expect a cuckoo coloration?
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2016
  2. Wappoke

    Wappoke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    this is not a true sex linked cross because you can not sex all the chicks with any degree of accuracy. The head spot means the bird is carrying the barring gene and if I am interpreting your descriptions correctly, the chick is a male.

    My answer is based upon the following, the blue marans is not carrying barring (if he did he would be blue barred) and the sapphire hen inherited a sex linked barring gene from the legbar rooster (the legbar was homozygous for sex linked barring)

    the saphire hen is carrying dominant white- some of the chicks will be white or white with black spots, you can not sex the white chicks with a reasonable degree of accuracy
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2016
  3. bauerdog

    bauerdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
    Hmmmmmm. Does this look like 2 males then?
     
  4. Wappoke

    Wappoke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My guess would be; the one on the left appears to be a male, the one on the right could be a male or female. Some of the male chicks will receive two barring genes and the others will inherit one barring gene. The females- some will inherit a barring gene and some will be non-barred.

    Sexing chicks by the size and shape of the head spot on a dark ground color is an inaccurate way of sexing chicks- around 75% in a normal barred rock cross. In your cross ( the chicks that do not have white down), the probability of hatching a male chick with a head spot is greater than hatching a female chick with a head spot. All the males will have a head spot and only half of the females will have a head spot.

    If you hatched out a large number of chicks some of the chicks would be white or white with black spots.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2016
  5. bauerdog

    bauerdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    These were the only two. I was only placating a broody. I wound up with a double barred male and a single barred female.
     
  6. bauerdog

    bauerdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for the great explanation. Genetics is very interesting, but overwhelming to sort out on your own without help
     

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