Genetics questions

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by yyz0yyz0, Feb 27, 2015.

  1. yyz0yyz0

    yyz0yyz0 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 2, 2012
    Hello all,
    I have a flock of 7 hens and one Roo that I'm planning on starting to raise eggs from the flock by letting a broody hen hatch and raise them.

    I have some questions regarding chicken genetics and my plans.

    All of my hens are Wyandottes(3GL and 4 GL) and they are all the within a week of each other age wise and will be 2yrs this spring.

    Genetics questions:
    We get quite a variety of egg sizes from these hens. If I let the hen hatch a group of larger eggs will I be breeding for chickens that tend to lay larger eggs?

    I plan to let the broody have 8eggs to hatch and come this fall I will cull any hatched roos and also cull as many of the older birds as I got hatched hens. If this all works out for me then I plan to do this every spring to "freshen" the flock yearly. If I do it like this, after the first year my hatched hens will be breeding with their father. Is this interbreeding going to cause issues, will I need to get a roo from outside my flock at specific intervals to keep them from getting too interbred?


    Non-Genetics question:
    How do I keep eggs that I want to give to the broody hen until I have enough for her to sit on? Do I refrigerate them, keep them at room temp?

    thanks
     
  2. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You only want to hatch the largest eggs if egg size is your goal but I would also want to know who is the 4 a week and who is the 6 a week layer. I'd rather hatch a med size egg out of a hen that laid almost everyday over an XL that only lays 3-4. Most breeding programs will use the rooster for 2 full seasons than change him out. You might find out in the first batch of pullets that they are inferior layers to their mothers so that should prompt you to replace him sooner. Roosters are a dime a dozen on CL so getting a different or higher quality one is the least of your problems. You will probably find that in a few years you want to go in a different direction too with your birds and that will open up other options.

    Just keep your eggs on the counter in an egg carton until you are ready to set them. I would check every hen's eggs for fertility first so you are only setting eggs that have the highest probability of developing.
     
  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Exactly what I was going to say, saved me the typing [​IMG]

    Any time you have issues with chicks or offspring, you can try changing out your rooster. As stated, they're easy peasy to find, especially in the late spring when the Oops boys are making themselves known.
     
  4. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Only looking out for you...
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Save my poor fingers all that work.....
     
  6. yyz0yyz0

    yyz0yyz0 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How do I tell if an is fertile before it starts to develop?
     
  7. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can't other than by cracking them. Crack every egg you eat onto a plate or bowl. Check for the bullseye. Make a note of which eggs are good and start collecting those.
     

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