1. kada6305

    kada6305 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is there somewhere I could go to learn about genotypes? I want to learn about breeding. I want to start breeding silkies in a year or so but have no clue about genotypes to put into the chicken calculator. I breed my current flock but for my own use of eggs and meat but would like to learn about their genotypes as well. Any help is much appreciated!
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Get a few different search engines (Google is a good one but won't find everything) and search the word 'genotype'. That'll bring you all manner of info from all manner of sources.

    Best wishes.
     
  3. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't get why the interest for colorbreeding is combined with the silky breed... ;)
    Best show your silkies to get clues about their genotype.
     
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  4. kada6305

    kada6305 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't have them yet :) I am getting eggs this week. I think it would just bbe fun to experiment with the color genetics. Who knows, might end up with somethign great at the end!
     
  5. Yellow House Farm

    Yellow House Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Lesson in breeding Silkies #1: ONE DOES NOT BEGIN BREEDING SILKIES VIA THE PURCHASE OF HATCHING EGGS!

    Silkies are one of the most highly bred breeds extant today. The most efficient way to begin is with a well selected trio from an established breeder who is an active shower at APA/ABA sanctioned shows. Indeed, the same could be said for any breed, but this is especially true of breeds like Silkies, Cochins, RIRs, Plymouth Rocks, Orpingtons, Leghorns, Call Ducks, Old English Game bantams, Cornish, Runner ducks, geese in any breed, NH's, Wyandottes, Polish, Hamburgs, et al. Starting with anything else is either ensuring utter failure or ensuring that once one learns the highway one is going to have to get rid of everything and start from scratch.
     
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  6. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    I'd have to agree with that, if you want good stock you're very unlikely to get them from a large commercial hatchery, among many other strong reasons to buy from a dedicated breeder. Being able to view the parents is often very important too.

    Your chosen hatchery may be the exception to the rule but if you're unfamiliar with Silkies, your eye won't be trained to identify the many faults that are likely plain to the more experienced eye, so it's more likely than not to be a bad start.

    Best wishes.
     
  7. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    My Coop
    YHF is right! Don't even bother starting with eggs or chicks.
    You won't be the exception to the rule, sigh. Get
    started birds,
    breeders who are being retired and have a season ro two of breeding left in them
    adult birds.
    Here's the motto to start you out on the road to success:

    Make sure you buy from a vintage line-bred strain which is winning in quality competition
    over multiple generations.

    Here's why. I am an expert a screwing up trying to start an SOP flock. Made just about every mistake in the book
    before I finally followed the exact advice above and got a good start in my new breed, Sussex fowl.
    Why?
    1. vintage line-bred: this strain has been skillfully concentrating virtue in a pedigree
    for an extended length of time. This has 2 advantages.
    a. line-breeding is a "safe" way of "inbreeding" which concentrates virtue without losing diversity or too closely concentrating faults in a gene pool.
    b. The length of time it takes to create a "vintage" strain means the top breeder has stabilized the genes in the gene pool so they replicate pretty reliably from generation to generation. This is especially valuable when working with complicated colors like speckled or double laced varieties which must have that stability to properly replicate thru the generations.
    2. winning in quality competition: This means the big shows like Columbus, The Bluebonnet Classic, Northeastern Poultry Congress, Louisville KY, Newnan, GA, etc. . Taking on all comers over and succeeding to Champion Row. Or if a rarer breed, at least to Best of Breed over large entries.
    c. Over multiple generations : Not just winning in one generation either, This breeder has proved his/her quality breeding program holds its virtues and stability by winning over multiple generations.


    Of course you expect to pay more for your birds when starting this way. But the end result will be worth it. After I failed 5 times to start an SOP flock in another breed, Walt Boese, a Sussex breeder from Montana contacted me and wanted to know if I wanted to start a flock of his SQ Light Sussex. I had been studying the Sussex breed and was excited to say yes. Walt hatched a trio for me and raised them for almost a year to show condition them for me before sending them. I spent 100's to get them here from Montana. It was worth every penny. The birds have performing wonderfully and this season I am in my 2nd generation with his strain. One doesn't save money by starting with egg or baby chicks. One just buys their self disappointment and heartbreak. Blood tells.
    Make sure you tell the top breeder you are seeking foundation stock. You respect and want to work with their strain....and mean it! Do not cross strains to found a flock. You will rue the day! I can't warn too severely about this. There is plenty of genetic diversity in the poultry world to appease your artist's eye while linebreeding on an established strain. There's a reason why these top flocks are line-bred. It's because linebreeding creates genetic stability which allows the breeder to tweak the gene pool to its highest levels of perfection. Crossing strains negates that stability and it can take many years to get it back depending on the complication of just the color pattern itself, let alone other genetic traits.
    Best Regards,
    Karen in western PA, USA
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2014
  8. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    western PA
    My Coop
    Back to the subject of genotypes. I found this book to be invaluable and worth much
    more than its price. Just a stupendous, helpful book. The 1st half of the book is an easily
    understandable explanations of genotypes. The 2nd half is a pictorial encyclopedia of poultry
    genotypes, captioned by the genotype formula. I look forward to getting the second book
    on Chicken Extremities. A bit more scientific, it covers the genetics of everything else but
    plumage.
    http://www.chickencolours.com/
    Best Regards,
    Karen
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2014
  9. armansourani

    armansourani Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 14, 2014
    hey gentlemen.
    i was searching for a topic about brahma colour inheritance.i would be thankful if somebody copy a link about.thanks:p
     

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