Geriatric Hen

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Mskittychick, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. Mskittychick

    Mskittychick New Egg

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    Feb 17, 2012
    I am helping a friend with an elderly (15 this year) hen who stopped eating. I was able to get her to eat a little by holding live meal worms (yechhhh) in my hand until they warmed up. She liked them, but wasn't interested in her regular food. She has been at the Vet for about three weeks and is due to be released back in our care at the beginning of the week.
    Can anyone recommend the "best" methods of tube feeding your chicken, holding your chicken etc. so that she can live out her days in comfort? Any suggestions would be appreciated - I'm a total chicken novice but have done cat rescue work for over 25 years. She is a beautiful black hen.
    Thank you for any and all suggestions
     
  2. Country4ever

    Country4ever Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 26, 2007
    Wow!! 15???? Mine are 9 and I thought that was old.
    I know this isn't what you want to hear, but I'm thinking its time to let nature take its course. Offer soft, nutritious food to her, and water with vitamins and electrolytes in it. But if she can't eat herself, and she is 15, its time to accept what is to be.
    When you get her, I wouldn't put her back with other chickens, unless you are there every second for a few days, to be sure they won't kill her........which is a real possibility.
    Can you keep her in your house in a crate? Just make sure she has good bedding, food and water and can get some sun. Don't forget grit. I hope they offered her grit at the Vets. I took care of one of my sick chickens in the house for awhile. I made sure the TV was on (or the radio) whenever I wasn't there. I put a mirror in her crate, in hopes that would help her not feel alone.
    Good luck to you and this elderly sweetheart.
     
  3. Mskittychick

    Mskittychick New Egg

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    Feb 17, 2012
    Our girl is housed in an inside coop and is separated from Miss Rosie (Red hen). They can talk to each other but don't physically interact.
    Thank you for your suggestions - will covey to my friend.
     

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