German Shepard Breeding Program!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Imissmyroofabio, Apr 1, 2012.

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  1. Imissmyroofabio

    Imissmyroofabio Out Of The Brooder

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    waiting for this to be deleted....
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2012
  2. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    co-ownership is pretty common in purebred dogs, but what requirements do they have for the dog to be bred? Do they require that you title the dog in something? Do they require you to have hips/elbows/eyes/other genetic tests done? If the answer to any of these questions is no, run away!

    what are they charging for these dogs? A good quality german shepherd with all the health tests and titled parents and a health/hip guarantee and a lifetime of breeder help and support will run about $1200. Sometimes less for a pet quality dog.

    I co-own my boy Singe. His breeder retains the breeding rights for X number of years. I am required to title him, have his hips x-rayed at 2, etc etc If any of these requirements aren't met or he doesn't pass his health screenings, then he will be neutered.

    I sent you a PM. I would recommend contacting a rescue group and adopting a dog if you are looking for a less-expensive option.


    ETA: another thing to consider: females dying in labor isn't uncommon. females being injured by a male during breeding isn't impossible. males being injured by females isn't impossible either.
    Are you prepared for the task of having an unaltered female? Not even 5 seconds outside unattended when she is in heat? Stray males possibly hanging around in your yard because they know she is in heat? The fact that she might have a personality change after pregnancy?
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2012
  3. sunturtle

    sunturtle Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 25, 2012
    i live in maine and have a black shephard female looking for a husband.
     
  4. Squawkbox

    Squawkbox Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm sorry, but come on people! It is German ShepHERD!!! You want to breed yet can't even spell the name of the breed. [​IMG]
     
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  5. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    lol squawk, I see that misspelling so much, I didn't even notice it.

    sunturtle, min health tests for a german shepherd would be hips, elbows, and eyes. Not just on the female, but on her parents, grandparents, as many siblings as possible. Either real world work experience (SAR, Police K9, herding, stock work) or titles (conformation, obedience, tracking, schutzhund, herding, or similar). The same criteria of course for the male.

    Also taken into consideration would be family history of titles, correct temperament, working ability, bloat, heart disease, DM, EPI, and other ailments common to the breed.
     
  6. Squawkbox

    Squawkbox Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lol I don't mean to be snarky or anything but I just really do not comprehend how people (many whom are grown adults) cannot spell shepherd, it actually flabbergasts me. They don't hard,erd,ard,or eard, they herd!! [​IMG]
     
  7. sunturtle

    sunturtle Out Of The Brooder

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    well, i wasnt so worried about the spelling. i didnt know that was something i had to worry about on the site.
     
  8. sunturtle

    sunturtle Out Of The Brooder

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    my dog does HERD so sorry for my spelling
     
  9. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    it is something to think about, though, if you are looking for a good stud dog. :) GSD people can be a bit anal about things like that. Anyone with a quality dog would throw your letter/email of interest away before they even opened it, just from a subject line that was misspelled. The reason is that most people who misspell the name do so because they know absolutely NOTHING about the breed. Why would someone with a quality dog (or female) waste their time on what is likely to be a pet quality animal owned by someone who hasn't even taken the time to learn what dog they have? It would lead them to believe that you (generic you) know even less about the health requirements, testing, titling, and research involved in producing healthy animals.

    If you are interested in breeding her, here are a few of the min questions a good stud owner will ask:

    -what lines is she? (American show, American working, DDR, Czech, etc etc)
    -what faults does she have?
    -what good qualities?
    -what titles does she have or work (SAR, narcotics, herding, etc) does she do?
    -OFA or PennHip score?
    -CERF?
    -is her family tree free of DM, EPI and other genetic issues?
    -what did her ancestors die from and at what age?
    -what are the other dogs from her litter achieved? other litters of her parents? (Even if your dog is the greatest thing in the world, it doesn't matter if the other 10 pups in the litter turned out horrible - that means that there is a good chance her good qualities wouldn't be inherited by her pups)
    -why are you interested in my dog as a stud for her?

    Anyone who doesn't ask these questions and dozens more is not a dog that is worthy of your female.

    ETA: as a potential puppy buyer, I would be asking those same questions. And would also not be interested in talking to anyone about shepard puppies!
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2012
  10. naturalfeddogs

    naturalfeddogs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What makes her suitable to breed?
     
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