Getting a rooster

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by harleyjo, Jun 25, 2010.

  1. harleyjo

    harleyjo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 6, 2010
    SW Iowa
    I may be getting a rooster from someone we are going to do a job for. It is from last years hatch. I have 13 pullets. Ten of them are 9 weeks old and 3 of them are 6 weeks or so. Is this going to be a problem to put him right in the coop with them?
     
  2. lauralou

    lauralou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 10, 2007
    Central Virginia
    It doesn't seem to be the best idea.

    Your girls are much younger and smaller. It's physically dangerous for them.

    Also, he could possibly bring in some "germs" that they've never been exposed to. If you really, really want him, you should at least consider keeping him separated from them for a month or so, just to make sure that he's healthy. It's still no guarantee, but it's better than just throwing him into the mix.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2010
  3. harleyjo

    harleyjo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 6, 2010
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    Ok, if that is the case what is the best way to add a rooster to the bunch? I have limited space. I don't have unlimited areas to isolate all the different ages of chickens and chicks. I may be getting another batch of cornish cross chicks in Sept. if I do is that a time to have them add a rooster of the breed that I want?

    Then I couldn't keep him with them because they will be all over him as fast as they grow. I don't want more than one roo at this time. I will get more pullets next spring and could get the roo then also. We just thought if it would work out that this was a pretty rooster.

    I also want to know how to decide what roo to get. I want to keep the heavy breeds that are good egg producers but will also be keep a fresh stock every 18 months to 2 years. I also have been told it is good to get new roos every couple of years to get new blood. Maybe this is a topic for a different post but I don't know what crosses produces what chickens.
     
  4. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    harleyjo, you have to be sure your rooster is mature. A young rooster will be a problem for your youngsters. The age of the rooster should be at least a year and a half. I have raised gamefowl for many years. When my chicks are weened from their mom, I put them in a large pen with a mature cock to police them. Not only does this mature cock keep the young killers from fighting, but he is always very good to them, calling them for treats and acting like a dad should with both stags and pullets. I`m sure there are exceptions, but I have not had one. A rooster hatched last year might be OK if itwas early last year. Guess ya gotta try him and see.

    I don`t think changing roosters every 18-24 months is needed. Maybe if you are producing eggs for a hatchery, but those operations usually change hens also to get the highest production possible. Most of us, especially with small hobby farms, will never need to be concerned with all that. Good luck.........Pop
     

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