Getting chickens into nursing homes

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by smw18, Mar 6, 2012.

  1. smw18

    smw18 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, I was on google and found chicken diapers and got the great idea for a few of my chickens. I want to be able to bring them into hospitals, and nursing homes. I spoke it over with a friend of mine about starting off in letting a class of her older kids come out and learn more about them, and other animals. She had wanted to make a little pen and let the kids feed the mini horses, and I am sort of on the other side of the fence on that. I also want my old bullmastiff there, but am wondering if it would be to much for her to handle, and we have to get a few things before doing that.
    So, my question for you all, how do I get my chickens into being alloud into nursing homes, child care facilities, and probably hospitals. I had always wanted to do it with my old dog, but her hips are getting a little bad, and the slippery floors wouldnt be to good on her, so I have at least 3 great chickens, and I want to geese to get in on it to. Any ideas how?
     
  2. GardenerGal

    GardenerGal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lord forgive me, but when I read about chicken diapers and visiting nursing homes, I had this image of the nursing home residents looking at the diapered chooks and saying to them, "We know exactly how you feel!" [​IMG]

    I do believe that we need to be very careful and take precautions when bringing animals of any type into a hospital, nursing home, school or any kind of institutional facility, especially when they are the more "exotic" types of animals beyond ordinary dogs and cats. "Therapy animals" such as dogs and cats are easier to allow because those domestic animals are such a normal part of human life and habitation.

    The problem I see with chickens (and I would love to take a big, gentle cochin hen to the local nursing homes as a "Therapy Chicken"), is that even if diapered, health-care people often are concerned about "farm animals" being "dirty" -- mites and lice, the disease risk of salmonella and other bacterial illnesses that could be borne on the chicken's feet, feathers and saliva. Some of the concerns are valid, but sometimes they aren't because it's a lack of familiarity with farm animals and an irrational, emotional response to "dirty farm" vs. "clean home" domestic animals.

    As for hospitals, where it's hard enough keeping germy humans from contaminating the patients, I would really wonder whether they would be at all receptive to any kind of pet coming in!

    But on the optimistic side, I've read about bunnies being brought to nursing homes and the use of thick, clean towels set in a person's lap to hold the rabbit (which had its nails clipped). The bunnies were bathed and spotlessly clean before visiting, too. Similarly, you could bathe your chickens, make sure their claws and beaks are trimmed and clean, and perhaps try the thick towel approach in addition to (or instead of) diapering.

    Just some thoughts.
     
  3. Nitrous

    Nitrous Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My chickens never live long enough to get into nursing hom- oh!
     
  4. conny63malies

    conny63malies Overrun With Chickens

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    I think nursing home might think there is a difference, between a cute white fluffy clean silkie hen and a "normal" backyard bird. Espec. if you wash the white bird with that shampoo you can buy for white dogs.
     
  5. GardenerGal

    GardenerGal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, a fluffy white silkie hen would likely be seen as being like an angora kitten or bunny. Tying a cute pink bow on the silkie's "top not" might help too.
     
  6. popoton

    popoton Out Of The Brooder

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    I have taken some of my chickens to a nursing home and it went well. Everytime that someone held my hen they would tell me a story from their youth about chickens they had. Some would hold and pet my hen for a long time . Some asked to have a picture taken with my rooster.
     
  7. conny63malies

    conny63malies Overrun With Chickens

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    Maybe a seasonally themed saddle and diaper combo to add to the whole thing?

     
  8. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    contact the nursing home that you have in mind. talk over your idea with the administration. then you will know exactly what will be required since the rules about visiting animals varies by state, county, city, and individual business.
     
  9. GardenerGal

    GardenerGal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    lol! That might be a little over the top. Maybe the diaper, pink bow and a cupid bow-and-arrows slung over the silkie's back for Valentine's Day. [​IMG]

     
  10. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    A nursing home is the reason I have to move my flock. They complained.. Now I have this image in my head that the elderly hate chickens. I would never take mine to visit them. Better off taking them to a daycare. Kids know how to appreciate the quality things in life.
     

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