Getting Chicks ready for coop?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by jmtcmkb, Oct 25, 2011.

  1. jmtcmkb

    jmtcmkb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 2, 2011
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    My chicks are 4 weeks, mostly feathered I can still see fuzzy heads, and fuzzy under the wings. I am trying to get them ready for moving out into the coop over the next few weeks. They have an ecoglow for heat. Do you think it is safe to leave the window open a good amount in the room during the day time hours to get them to adjust? The room temp has been about 65* for the most part for several weeks, they rarely go for heat during the day. I leave the top of the window cracked, but I am thinking of opening it more to lower the room temp naturally. I have the side of the brooder closest to the window covered with a towel to prevent drafts. Our outdoor temps are mid 50's during the day and low 40's in the evening.

    I love watching them when they hear noises from outside the house, we have had a bunch of crows being very loud lately and the chicks listen so intently its cute!
     
  2. Marcymom3

    Marcymom3 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Is an ecoglow a lamp? Are you going to keep it on? If so, opening the window would probably be fine. They are big enough to know if they need a little warming up. It was still cool here in early June when I moved my chicks from the livingroom [​IMG] to the screened porch. They were 4 weeks old and the days were as you described. I kept the light on but seldom saw them huddled under it except at night. They liked to watch the little birds eating at the feeder on the corner of the porch too. You're right, so cute!
     
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    There are any number of ways of acclimating the chicks, gently, to ever lower temperatures. Lowering the temps of their "assistant" down to 75F is wise. Raising it higher and higher helps as well. If you have them indoors in a house that is 65-70 degrees anyhow, their need for any assistance, day or night, is nearing the end.

    Or, you could take them to a cooler place, such as an unheated garage or shed and provide only some gentle, night time assistance. Use an extension cord of good quality and you could take them just about anywhere. Most chicks take a full 6 weeks to really, fully, feather out.
     
  4. jmtcmkb

    jmtcmkb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Yes an ecoglow is a "lamp" of sorts it is a radiant heat source made for chicks, baby ducks etc and I will leave it on 24/7 at least this week, next week I will turn it off during the day time hours.
     
  5. jmtcmkb

    jmtcmkb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 2, 2011
    New Hampshire
    Fred's Hens :

    There are any number of ways of acclimating the chicks, gently, to ever lower temperatures. Lowering the temps of their "assistant" down to 75F is wise. Raising it higher and higher helps as well. If you have them indoors in a house that is 65-70 degrees anyhow, their need for any assistance, day or night, is nearing the end.

    Or, you could take them to a cooler place, such as an unheated garage or shed and provide only some gentle, night time assistance. Use an extension cord of good quality and you could take them just about anywhere. Most chicks take a full 6 weeks to really, fully, feather out.

    Thank you.. No garage here, or enclosed porch and the shed I would guess is just like the coop. We do have a heavy duty extension cord ready to use for the ecoglow, just need to figure out how to keep them away from the cord.

    6 weeks seems to be about right when I look at their feathering now.​
     
  6. CupOJoe42

    CupOJoe42 CT Chicken Whisperer

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    I used the EcoGlow with my chicks (love it!) I would give them another week or 2, then remove the EcoGlow. Give them a week to adjust and then they should be ready to go out in the coop. Chickens are a lot hardier than we give them credit for. Imagine wearing a down jacket all day long? The most important thing is that they are kept dry and draft free. Your coop needs ventilation. If they get cold, they will huddle together.
     

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