getting eggs in the winter

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by TonyZ, Dec 6, 2009.

  1. TonyZ

    TonyZ New Egg

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    Nov 7, 2009
    how do you keep steady egg laying through the short days of winter? or should i give my girls a break?
     
  2. paulpig

    paulpig Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 4, 2009
    Give your girls a break???? ROFLMAO
     
  3. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    [​IMG]
    It's a matter of personal choice. To increase production during the winter some people opt to add supplemental lighting to increase the amount of light to 14 hours a day. Other folks just let their chickens stay in sync with the seasons and have a decrease in production during the short days of winter. Whichever works for you is good. There have been no definitive studies saying that either is better or worse for the chickens in a long run. Good luck.
     
  4. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    One way to do it and keep it "natural" is to hatch in the late spring so they start laying in Oct, Nov. The younger layers aren't bothered by the shorter days and will lay thru the winter.

    Steve in NC
     
  5. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Nov 12, 2009
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    That explains why I have laying machines, mine were hatched at the end of May, have been laying steady for a month, and getting more productive as time goes on and as the days are getting shorter.

    I have been thinking, (I think the beginning of the addiction might be forming) if you had two flocks, a early spring hatch, and a late spring hatch or maybe even a fall hatch, then when one group would be in molt, the others would be laying?
     
  6. trilyn

    trilyn Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 13, 2009
    East Syracuse
    Mrs. K :

    That explains why I have laying machines, mine were hatched at the end of May, have been laying steady for a month, and getting more productive as time goes on and as the days are getting shorter.

    I have been thinking, (I think the beginning of the addiction might be forming) if you had two flocks, a early spring hatch, and a late spring hatch or maybe even a fall hatch, then when one group would be in molt, the others would be laying?

    Definitely signs of an addiction!! lol I'd love to know the answer to this myself-it makes sense to me though. [​IMG]
     
  7. kipper

    kipper Chillin' With My Peeps

    I'd heard the same about late spring pullets, and so far it's true. Our 15 were hatched 6/8/09, just started laying a couple of weeks ago, and now lay 8 eggs a day. Not too shabby for new layers! There is maybe 9 hours of daylight here, and it is usually very cloudy and gloomy when it is daytime. They don't seem to give a rip!

    I am not that clever; I didn't plan on such late pullets, I had to order late to get the selection I wanted! I will do it again due to the results, though!
     

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