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Getting prepared

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by KelsiNS, Jul 25, 2013.

  1. KelsiNS

    KelsiNS Songster

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    I have 30 chicks shipping on monday, and have never raised chicks so young. We have two large brooders in the home gym/bedroom area (no garage). I have pine shavings about 1" deep, with waterers and long feeders. We have chick starter 24% and chick grit. I have a soft light for them, but it doesnt get very hot. The room theyll be in gets to the low/mid 90s if i leave the a/c off. At night it will get chilly, and i have a lamp with a 40w bulb-but we quit using it because the bugger got screaming hot. We couldnt find any brooder lamps anywhere. What can i use as a substitute for heat that isnt such a fier hazard?
     
  2. five is my dog

    five is my dog Songster

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    you could use a red light with a reflector or just put a heater in that one room.
     
  3. ChirpyChicks1

    ChirpyChicks1 Songster 5 Years

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    Jul 22, 2013
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    I got my heat lamp with clamp at Walmart. You could place a "lid" of chicken wire over the brooder so the lamp couldn't fall into the brooder. But personally I think it's very easy to securely attach a heat lamp.
    Very good idea. I think anything that will provide heat will be considered a fire hazard lol
     
  4. KelsiNS

    KelsiNS Songster

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    Our walmart didnt have anything that could even be rigged as a heat lamp :/ tractor supply had ONE, but someone had broken it and put it back on the shelf. (I hate it when people do that crap). I have a space heater that ill try. Its hard to figurr out how to make it work-theyll basically be in our bedroom so the temp and lighting cant get so harsh it keeps my husband awake all night. I do have several heating pads-since the heater will be so indirect, would a heating pad be helpful?
     
  5. five is my dog

    five is my dog Songster

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    that might only supply heat to their feet or if they lay down it could work though but as long as the heater gets the room to about 90-5 degrees they will be fine. you also might leave the light on in the room so they run around if they dont have light they huddle up and don t run around.
     
  6. Did you look in the hardware section of Walmart? I have seen them in ours and it is a very little store...the reflector part I mean, and the heat lamps too, although be careful to not over heat them, in these summer temps...you will know by their behavior if they are too warm, they will pant and stay far away from any heat source, if too cold, huddle together..both most usually will have them peeping the heads off also...running around, eating, drinking, pooping and sleeping they are just right! They will, most likey all sleep together, that is different than huddling for heat from being too cold! Let them tell you and you will be fine!!!

    Congrats and best of luck!
     
  7. LoneOak

    LoneOak Chirping

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    Do you have a Home depot near by? Brooder Clamp Light

    I sure if you look in the right department at Walmart, I'm sure they will have this, 8" super Clamp Light in the hardware dept below the extension cords.

    Hang it from the ceiling with a rope or chain, use a 120 watt spot light bulb this time of year, get a thermometer to put in the brooder box, raise or lower the light to adjust the heat in the brooder. Keep the temp about 90 degrees for the first week , then raise the light for 85 degree the second week, then to 80 for the third week and you should be able to go to room temp after that. You don't have to have exact temp just close and in the ballpark.
     
  8. vthokie

    vthokie In the Brooder

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    Jul 27, 2013
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    I personally use an Ecoglow brooder heat source. I have the 20 chick version, but they have a 50 chick version too. The 50 chick version uses 60 watts of power, but you'll have the peace of mind of not having a fire hazard. Or you could get two 20 chick versions for a combined 36 watts of power used. That's a significant amount of power savings over the long run. Also, there is no need to move the Ecoglow up or down to adjust the temperature like you would for a standard bulb type. You would only have to move the heating element up or down as they get older to accommodate for their growing bodies.

    They are a bit pricy, but for me well worth it for the peace of mind that my house won't burn down when I'm away and the 'set it and forget it' easy of use. Also, in the long run, the amount of energy saved will more than pay for the Ecoglow. Like I said, I would just get two 20 chick versions because it'll consume even less power and I think its less expensive. I got mine from Amazon for $60 [20 Chick version]. Oh, one last thing, it's not a light, so it won't keep your husband from sleeping.

    Disclaimer: I've only used mine for about 6 days, but the chicks seem to be doing great and if you search 'Ecoglow reviews' on the forum you get a lot of positive experiences.

    Howard.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2013
  9. My turn to ask you a question [​IMG] Do you really put heat on them this time of year after a few days or a week? Aren't you guys and the OP in areas that are 90 to 95 degrees ambient temps? If so, why do you add heat if the ambient temp is near or at the temps they should be brooded at? Just asking cause I am curious...I have read so much on here, and so many people have so many different approaches to brooding chicks by people and not by mamma chicken...thanks so much !
     
  10. LoneOak

    LoneOak Chirping

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    Quote: After the first week where I'm at I would need no heat but I would keep it ready just for the nights when the temp drops down in the 70's. This year has been really strange temp wise and we haven't seen any days above 90 in the Atlanta area. The last group of chicks I got in early June I kept the brooder light on for about a month but I have two thermometers in my homemade brooder and kept the temp in the 85 to 90 degree range. It is easy to tell if the birds are too hot as they will hide in the shade and if their too cold they will huddle together under the light. If they are scattered out in the brooder in groups of 2,3 or 6 chicks then you know they are fine, there will usually be the one loner that hangs out by herself also.

    The ambient temp here has just now gotten to the point where day old birds wouldn't need heat during the day but the night time temps still drop into the low 70's so they might need a little blanket or something to help keep them warm. The real secret is to have that thermometer in the brooder and monitor it closely and keep the temp steady where it needs to be, like I said earlier it doesn't have to be exact but it needs to be close at least in the ballpark.
     

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