Getting puppy

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by michickenwrangler, May 19, 2011.

  1. michickenwrangler

    michickenwrangler To Finish Is To Win

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    One of my co-workers needs to find a home for an 8 week old Lab/Border Collie mix. And since I wanted to get a younger dog since my dog is getting on in years, I offered. So ... after Memorial Day, we will bring her home. I'll post pics when I get some.

    It's been awhile since I've dealt with a young dog, so refresher advice is welcome, especially for dealing with old/young dogs together.
     
  2. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Will this be an primarily inside dog, or outside dog? The training can really differ between the two. [​IMG]
     
  3. michickenwrangler

    michickenwrangler To Finish Is To Win

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    Inside, although for my long days at work (parent-teacher conferences where I work 8am-9pm) I'll probably keep both dogs in a kennel for those days.
     
  4. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    Looking forward to pix.

    Congrats on the new family member.

    Imp
     
  5. michickenwrangler

    michickenwrangler To Finish Is To Win

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    OK,

    I'm picking her up tomorrow after work. We've decided to name her Stormy (breeder's kids--one of which is a student of mine--were calling her Thor). I'll post pics tomorrow night.

    Any tips for crate-training?
     
  6. annanicole18

    annanicole18 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just make sure crate isn't too big at first preferably with a divider to up the size as she gets bigger so she doesn't potty in her den. try and keep on as regular a schedule as possible and with it being so hot out watch that if she drinks a lot of water that you up the number of potty breaks after a romp outside. Enjoy and we all want baby pictures!!!
     
  7. Haviris2

    Haviris2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can't wait to see her! My best tip take her out often and no matter how much she crys while in the crate don't give in and don't give her any attention (even telling her to shush, just ignore her) while she's crying.
     
  8. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    With the exception of dogs coming from neglect cases (where they are stuck in small cages and forced to walk in their own excrement to the point that they get habituated to it), crate training for potty training has been the easiest method I've found. Some people double other methods with it (ie. ringing a bell hanging on a doorknob every time they take their pup out to potty until the dog starts ringing it themselves when they need to go out, etc). Basically, whenever you are not 100 percent supervising your pup, then put pup in the crate. To use this method, you have to ensure you can let the puppy out often. For eight weeks, every two hours is usually the time given. Schedules help immensely at this stage. Feed the dog at certain times, let the dog out to pee at certain times. If the crate method isn't working, then I'd try something else, but it is always the method I start with because it is the method I've had the most success with...sometimes amazing success with puppies and adult dogs that were adopted untrained. If you use a crate though, the crate is never, ever to be a place of punishment. No time outs in there, no "bad dogs" and shoving them in there. Treats and praise only around the crate, and you will have a dog willing and happy to go in there. Use punishment, and you'll be fighting the dog every time and dealing with howling non-stop. Make it a positive thing, and keep it a positive thing, no matter how tempting it is to put a dog in there for a quick time out. Praise when your pup eliminates outside too. Picking a certain place in the yard to have the pup eliminate at can also help. In some breeds it is harder to see that others, but puppies have at least subtle shifts in the position they hold their tail, backs, and rumps in when they are about to eliminate (all over your carpets, aha).

    On introducing old dogs to young dogs, everyone does it differently and swears their way is right. [​IMG] I prefer the methods that use a screen or barrier between the two at first, on neutral ground, and then a slow introduction. Walking the dogs near each other on leashes can also help, and then letting them get used to each other on leash at their own pace. A frontal 'assault', even if it is just a boisterous tackle of licks, can be a very nerve wracking introduction for any dogs, side by side is usually less assertive. Rewards, praise, supervision, and being aware of both dogs and their body language is important. Think ahead and pick up any food, toys, or other objects that could cause conflict. Be aware that you yourself may be cause for aggression if your older dog is very possessive of you. It is often better to correct over-possessiveness first before adding in a new dog. The most common point of conflict I see in puppy-adult introductions though is a too-boisterous puppy that annoys an older dog. Don't let the older dog push the pup around, but don't let the pup terrorize the older dog.

    Good luck!
     
  9. sunny & the 5 egg layers

    sunny & the 5 egg layers Overrun With Chickens

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    Did you get the puppy? [​IMG]
     
  10. michickenwrangler

    michickenwrangler To Finish Is To Win

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    Yup [​IMG]

    She's home and settling in (napping right now a few feet away). So far the current dog Blaze is being tolerant of her, actually tried to play with her a bit but is a bit possessive of her food and bed, but Stormy (the puppy) has learned to stay away.

    Left the camera in the truck.

    Pics tomorrow!
     

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