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Getting reaquainted with peafowl via Clinton9's illustrative data

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by Resolution, Oct 24, 2011.

  1. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

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    note- trailing secondary wing notch is present in these high flying specimens. The primary flight quill that fills in that notch is visible and growing in the photo of the Siamese- evidently the last flight quill to mature.

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    The trailing secondary wing notch is much reduced through the period of the year when the train does not extend far beyond the retrices.- during moult and during regrowth. The Sri Lanka peafowl is a few months further along in annual train development as we can assuage from the length of the train. The wing notch is closed during the last few weeks of the reproductive period about three- five weeks before the train begins to moult.


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    Here's a photo of a Black-Shouldered male in flight. You can almost make out the under wing. I don't have any or I'd photograph them for you.
    Quote:I do hope those of you rearing peafowl can contribute toward Clinton9's efforts. It's been a very long while since anyone gave the natural history and physiology of peafowl their due.
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    Clinton9 please repost your illustrations here.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2011
  2. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here are some of my data photographs of Afropavo chick development. I hope they are helpful -perhaps they can be included as outgroup in your data set?
    I'll dig around for my argus, crested argus and Javanese peafowl chick data sets when time permits.
    I'm curious to learn from you how this species develops so far as wing formula and moult sequence with that of the Indian peafowl in your studies.



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    Afropavo chick 30 days old.
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    Afropavo 6 weeks old
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    Afropavo 9 weeks
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    Afropavo 15 weeks

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    Afropavo 20 weeks
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2011
  3. clinton9

    clinton9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  4. FrankYLegend

    FrankYLegend Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello all,

    It is great to see some more of your informative posts, Kermit and nice illustrations Clinton9. It's great to see more people contributing to this research.

    It is great to hear progress with the research. There doesn't seem to be much else that I've read lately, though there is a 2008 paper where Chinese scientists studied the genetic divergence between Green and Indian Peafowl. They also found that there are two distinct forms of Green Peafowl in Yunnan which should be classified as distinct subspecies. As for conservation there's a study going on in Cambodia right now. I'm most uncertain about the reintroduction in Malaysia though; Martin told me that Spratt (Rodney Michael line) birds were used and a 2007 video of one in Malaysia looks a bit like a hybrid. There's also the birds of Janda Baik which appear to be Javanese.

    Also, with the recent flooding in Thailand, I wonder how Green Peafowl in the wild are coping.

    I saw the other thread. Thanks for clearing up those birds as Tennasirim and Annamensis and not hybrids, because Friedrich thought otherwise but somehow I didn't think so.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2011

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