'Giant' Gene......

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the SOP' started by Shamo Hybrid, Dec 18, 2018.

  1. Shamo Hybrid

    Shamo Hybrid Songster

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    Hola amigos and amigettes, I have a 6-7 month old Shamo cockerel and want to breed him in the future. You see, his dad is a GIANT standing at 3 feet tall! Well, I'm hoping mine grows to be that big..... the question is, since his dad is a giant, do you think he will have that 'giant gene' in him and will produce big offspring regardless of which hen I choose to mate him with? Or do I have to choose a Shamo hen who is very big and worthy enough in order to have a higher chance of producing giants? I'm just confused as to the genetic height of parents, say one is tall one is short = average?.... Or is it, once one has the giant gene in them, it is seeded in there and regardless of the other partner's genes if it passes through to some offspring then you will get giants that has the potential of it's father/mother who is a giant or has the giant lineage?
     
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  2. Cyprus

    Cyprus Master of the 'never give up' attitude

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    Not feeling like getting into the specifics of it. There is no such thing as a giant gene. Size is bred by selection.
    If you breed him to a small hen you will get smaller offspring.
     
  3. Shamo Hybrid

    Shamo Hybrid Songster

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    Yes, there is a such thing as a giant gene.... as with your bantams!
     
  4. Gray Farms

    Gray Farms Crowing

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    You'll need to breed him to the largest females. If you breed him to smaller females his offspring will be smaller.
     
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  5. Cyprus

    Cyprus Master of the 'never give up' attitude

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    No, there isn't.
    Please feel free to cite any scientific articles you find chronicling the presence of quote, 'giant gene' in chickens.
    Bantamization is not a gene on any chromosome or locus. They are bantams because, over time, they were selectively bred to be that small. If you've ever seen any bantam and large fowl crosses you should note that they are significantly larger than bantams.
    A 'Giant Gene' is not a gene in the dna of a chicken. It is selective breeding for larger size. That is my point.
     
  6. Shamo Hybrid

    Shamo Hybrid Songster

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    Here is what I found, this is for humans although I believe it pertains to chickens as well to some level! In yo face, Cyprus!! :tongue

    Gigantism :

    Finding a specific genetic cause for gigantism has proven to be difficult. Gigantism is the primary example of growth hormone hyper-secretion disorders, a group of illnesses that are not yet deeply understood.[6]

    Some common mutations have been associated with gigantism. Pediatric gigantism patients have shown to have duplications of genes on a specific chromosome, Xq26. Typically, these patients also experienced an onset of typical gigantism symptoms before reaching the age of 5. This indicates a possible linkage between gene duplications and the gigantism.[18]

    Additionally, DNA mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene are common in gigantism patients. They have been found to be present in about 29 percent of patients with gigantism.[7] AIP is labeled as a tumor suppressor gene and a pituitary adenoma disposition gene.[7][19]

    Mutations in AIP sequencing can have deleterious effects by inducing the development of pituitary adenomas which in turn can cause gigantism.[7][19]

    Two specific mutations in the AIP gene have been identified as possible causes of pituitary adenomas. These mutations also have the ability to cause adenoma growth to occur early in life.[20] This is typical in gigantism.

    Additionally, a large variety of other known genetic disorders have been found to influence the development of gigantism such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and 4, McCune-Albright syndrome, Carney complex, familial isolated pituitary adenoma, X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG).[7][21]

    Although various gene mutations have been associated with gigantism, over 50 percent of cases cannot be linked to genetic causes, showing the complex nature of the disorder.[6]
     
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  7. Cyprus

    Cyprus Master of the 'never give up' attitude

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    Didn't read all of that because, in case biology failed you, humans and chickens aren't the same species. You don't see feather mutation genes showing in humans, now do you?
     
  8. 2 many chickens

    2 many chickens Songster

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    :goodpost:
     
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  9. HuffleClaw

    HuffleClaw It’s your world, I’m just living in it

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    Sorry, but I’m busy rolling on the floor laughing, at the moment 36CA0181-BBE8-4C16-B6BD-7230019FD638.gif

    @Cyprus knows her stuff, you clearly don’t, that’s why you asked a question, TO LEARN. If you have no interest to learn, why even bother asking?
     
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  10. The Moonshiner

    The Moonshiner Professional Chicken Tender

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    X2
     
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