giant rock-packed crop

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by technodoll, May 27, 2010.

  1. technodoll

    technodoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 25, 2009
    Quebec, Canada
    My sweet little silkie hen has an obsession with eating rocks [​IMG]

    She's waddling around with a giant, distended crop full of rocks and looks uncomfortable, but not ill.

    She feels thin, I see her eating but her crop is so full of rocks I doubt she can get much nutrition in.

    Crop isn't impacted, still elastic - I tried to give her a tablespoon of vegetable oil but she choked on it (did NOT want to swallow) and then I massaged her crop for about 5 minutes, it feels so heavy and gritty and full - will this pass on its own?

    I won't allow her to free-range for a few days as she is only adding to the problem...

    Any advice? Opinions?

    Thanks so much!! [​IMG]
     
  2. RevaVirginia

    RevaVirginia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 26, 2009
    Reva, VA
    I'm sure a great answer is coming. As for now though, I believe that you not allowing access to pebbles by keeping her from free ranging sounds like a good intervention. Good luck
    [​IMG]
     
  3. technodoll

    technodoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 25, 2009
    Quebec, Canada
    I hope to get some advice on this...

    will the rocks eventually pass?

    is this dangerous for her health?

    she's just gone broody, too... [​IMG]
     
  4. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    Michigan
    It's not good that she's gone broody...I'd put her in a cage with no nest box and a wire bottom if you have one; that should stop her broodiness. I'd treat this like impacted crop; do not feed for 24 hours and note the next day if her crop has gone down. If it has, then offer water with ACV - the acid should help. Then, I'd syringe olive oil several times a day and do VIGOROUS crop massages several times a day. When you can tell that the rocks are beginning to move down, slowly introduce food back, leaving the ACV/water in with her. You can also feed soft foods that are acidic like tomatoes and cucumbers. Chop finely.

    It could be that she's lacking in some mineral...they will often eat things that they shouldn't if they're lacking in something. I use Avia Charge 2000 in all drinking water for all my breeds - it's specifically formulated for chicken and is water soluble (i.e., what they don't use, just passes through) so there's no danger in them getting too much, and it supplies everything they may be lacking in their regular diet.

    GOOD LUCK!
     

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