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Giant Schnoodles?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Cubzwin1908, Feb 26, 2016.

  1. Cubzwin1908

    Cubzwin1908 Out Of The Brooder

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    Been doing some research for a possible new dog.. I see where the Giant Schnoodle's are being used for livestock guardians but haven't seen mention of them with chickens. Anyone have one or any experience with the breed?

    I like the fact that they are ok with working during the day and coming in the house at night. My coop is like Fort Knox and don't worry about the girls during the night but would love to have a large dog out with them during the day. Have too close of neighbors for a Pyr and I understand they are barkers which wouldn't go over well.
     
  2. Bigwig

    Bigwig Chillin' With My Peeps

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  3. Cubzwin1908

    Cubzwin1908 Out Of The Brooder

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    No....these are a mix of Giant Schnauzer and Standard Poodle. Sorry, I should have been more specific, : )
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    The cross is likely similar to my German Pointers where at least the long-haired verson shares some ancestry with poodles. My experience is that barking is restricted to when threat is directly seen or scented. Generally roaming is minimal where it is easy to imprint dog on location where is guards location directly with chickens serving more as sentinels during the day. The poodle side will likely promote a dog that responds well to training as has a strong prey drive that can be focused on other than the chickens. You will still have the typical protracted 18 months to 2 years before dog is fully broken in. Make certain all vacinations are done on the front side as dog is very likely to git bitten in the line of duty, especially when engaging predators for the first time.
     
  5. Cubzwin1908

    Cubzwin1908 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks so much for all the info. I think with good training and time this could be the dog I'm looking for. Unless there are horror stories yet to appear. : )
     
  6. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    The horror stories are part of the game but not a game ender. My best dogs always kill a bird to two before settling into the job. Try no to get over confident with young dog and keep its mind stimulated.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. gevshiba

    gevshiba Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You do know that Poodles are retrievers, right? Even if they aren't used for that purpose anymore, they still have that instinct.
     
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  8. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    Labs are retrievers also and there are a lot of reports on this site of labs being the perfect farm, family and livestock protectors.
     
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  9. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    My pointers are flat out hunting dogs used for birds in the US. With the same amount of effort required to get a standard LGD on the job the pointers learn to leave the chickens alone yet retain the prey drive for where it is needed. For more situations dog breed is not as important as training and individual dog.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Overrun With Chickens

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    Agreed. My last dog was a lab, as was the dog before it. The thing about bird dogs that people don't think about is, they are bred to have "soft mouths". You don't want a dog with a "hard mouth" that is going to put holes in your duck or pheasant when it's retrieving it. We had one dog that went out into a little wet spot out behind the barn one day and came back with a live, healthy blue-wing teal in his mouth. The bird was fine - not a bit of damage. It was just looking around like, "What the heck?" Got the bird away from the dog, dog went back out to the slough, came back holding his mouth funny, with grass hanging out of it. I held out my hand, told him to "drop it" and he deposited 3 intact little teal eggs into my hand! The biggest problem could be with a young dog playing with your chickens until they quit moving. One lab we had discovered that if he ran around and around the run enough, the chicken would panic, fly out and he'd jump up and catch it. We have since reinforced and covered our runs... The most important thing with any breed of dog is training, training, training. Some will be more trustworthy than others, but you just don't know until you try.

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    My "bird dog" Dakota. He thought he was the protector of the flock. He broke up lots of hen fights in his day, and would put an unruly rooster in his place, but never hurt a bird.
     
    1 person likes this.

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