Glass waterers & my invention -- Photo is back

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Sunny Side Up, Mar 14, 2011.

  1. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    Mar 12, 2008
    Loxahatchee, Florida
    The South Florida sun is murder on those plastic gallon-sized waterers. I am frequently having to replace the white tops as they deteriorate & crack, rendering them useless. The other day I was wishing there were waterers made that size which used glass for the tops. Then I remembered an old glass storage jar I had in the barn. Although the mouth of the jar didn't mesh with the threads of the red bottom of the waterer, I can still use it. It's a bit of a challenge holding it together and inverting it with one neat smooth motion, but once it's in place it works great. I just have to make sure the edge of the jar is over the hole in the base, and it dispenses water just as needed. The glass makes it heavy enough that the birds (now chicks) can't knock it over. The white thing you see on top of the glass is a plastic jug I have suspended so that it hangs right over the waterer, keeping the chicks from jumping & sitting (and pooping) on the waterer.

    Does anyone make a big waterer with a glass top that screws on a base? Wouldn't it be a great idea to devise one that could be used with big wide-mouthed jars, the way those little bases can fit on a mason jar?
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    [​IMG] Sorry folks, I didn't realize that the photo would disappear if I removed it from my uploads. This is new stuff for me, I'm a Wilma Flintstone trying to get along in a Jane Jetson world.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 14, 2011
  2. dianaross77

    dianaross77 Songster

    Oct 10, 2010
    Grand Blanc, MI
    Can't see the pic [​IMG]
     
  3. The Chicken People

    The Chicken People Songster

    May 4, 2009
    Smithville, Mo
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  4. b.hromada

    b.hromada Flock Mistress

    We can't see it Carol. [​IMG]
     
  5. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    Sep 4, 2009
    Minnesota
    Use the metal waterers, they don't get the icky growth on them of algea and such like the plastic ones do, and the glass ones probably do too. Besides, with glass you always take a chance at broken glass becoming a hazard around your birds.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. 2DogsFarm

    2DogsFarm Songster

    Apr 10, 2009
    NW Indiana
    I inherited a gallon-sized glass waterer (former owners of my house kept poultry).

    I love the old thing, but no longer use it as it would never survive a Midwest Winter & with fullgrown heavy breed hens, I'd worry about them knocking it over inside the coop.
    It was a Good Thing for my Houdan hen who routinely gets her crest sopping wet drinking from the dog bowl I use now.

    Also:
    although the glass part is as good as new, the plastic base has become so brittle with age I have to be really careful screwing it on or risk cracking it.

    Minniechick: I never had a problem with algae, but I kept the waterer inside the coop, not in the sun.
     
  7. CluckyJay

    CluckyJay Songster

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    Feb 23, 2011
    Crossville, Tennessee
    If you cover the top with something it will prevent that cracking. Glass is just good stuff though!
     
  8. 2DogsFarm

    2DogsFarm Songster

    Apr 10, 2009
    NW Indiana
    Quote:Clucky:
    Do you mean my "antique" waterer?

    It's the base/bottom not the top that is so old it has gotten fragile. The entire top is a glass jar that gets screwed onto the base then inverted to make it work.

    I may try buying a new base & see if that fits because I really like this oldtime waterer.
    It would still have to get retired each Winter & replaced with the heated dog bowl.
     
  9. GarlicEater

    GarlicEater Songster

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    Feb 23, 2011
    Gilroy, CA
    I see a lot of big ol' ceramic water jugs in antique shops - for not much - and I wonder if one of those could be adapted?

    Sun getting through to water means green stuff. Either periodic washing out (and swishing sand around inside to scrub it) or using something that blocks sun, but if it's in the sun it'll get hot. Hot water, girls? Wait, let me get you a tea bag....

    PVC is good, gets brittle so you just replace it once a decade.

    The 2nd law of thermodynamics never sleeps.
     
  10. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    Mar 12, 2008
    Loxahatchee, Florida
    Quote:Oh, great idea! I'll keep this in mind at the thrift stores, to see if they have something suitable. A glazed ceramic container, with a wide mouth that could stand inverted, and fit inside the plastic base. Some sort of jug, vase, vessel, even a cannister. It wouldn't deteriorate like plastic, but also wouldn't let in light or as much heat as glass. I'll have to measure the diameter of the bases and jot it down in my wallet.

    Sun getting through to water means green stuff...periodic washing out (and swishing sand around inside to scrub it)...

    A weekly soak with bleach & a scrub brush should do the trick.

    The 2nd law of thermodynamics never sleeps.

    And South Florida is its favorite place to be!​
     

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