GMO Information

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Weehopper, Oct 9, 2016.

  1. Weehopper

    Weehopper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here's a bit of what I looked up about GMO:
    Genetically modified: what exactly are we talking about?
    For thousands of years, humans have been genetically enhancing other organisms through the practice of selective breeding. Look around you: the sweet corn and seedless watermelons at the supermarket, the purebred dogs at the park, and your neighbor's prize rosebush are all examples of how humans have selectively enhanced desirable traits in other living things.

    The type of genetic enhancement that generates the most concern goes a step beyond selective breeding, however. Technology now allows us to transfer genes between organisms. For example, the tomato plant's beetle resistance relies on a gene from a bacterium (Bacillus thuringiensis), which scientists inserted into the tomato plant's genome. This gene, calledcry1Ac, encodes a protein that is poisonous to certain types of insects, including the beetle.

    How is this done? Gene transfer technology is simply a sophisticated version of a cut-and-paste operation. Once the desired gene is identified in the native organism's genome, it can be cut out, transferred to the target plant, and pasted into its genome. (The illustration to the right describes the "gene-gun" approach, which is one of several gene transfer methods.) Once the new gene has been introduced, the plant can be bred to create a new strain that passes the gene from generation to generation.

    Kind of interesting.
     
  2. 1cock2hens

    1cock2hens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Kind of scary..
     
  3. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    Kind of ordinary, really. Bacteria and viruses have been doing this (even to us!) for millennia. A large part of the human genome is cluttered up with genes that were accidentally introduced to us during the normal life cycle of viruses. Since these genes don't code for anything that our bodies do, the genes just sit there, getting passed on generation after generation. The only real difference here is that this foreign DNA is being introduced by design, and it actually does something.
     
  4. 1cock2hens

    1cock2hens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What about jellyfish DNA being introduced into sheep. It has happened and one was even sent to a slaughterhouse accidentally and sold as meet! That's not natural.... scientists have added scorpion DNA to cabbages! That is scary to me.

    We don't know what these things will do tonus in the long run, better safe than sorry.
     
  5. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    There is reason to believe that the sale of the lamb with the modified DNA was not an accident at all. Rather, it appears to have been a deliberate and malicious act done by people with an ax to grind - labs have protocols to prevent such things from happening. As for the scorpion DNA, that is still just an experiment, and the specific toxin coded for has been demonstrated to be lethal to insects and harmless to humans. I don't advocate wholesale scrambling of species, but shrieking and shrinking back at the mere mention of the term GMO does no good, either.
     
  6. 1cock2hens

    1cock2hens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If it's not broke don't fix it...
     
  7. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    That's the problem - some of the things that are done are done, not because the plant is "broke," but because the system is. Have you heard of golden rice? Someone had the bright idea to engineer rice so it can manufacture beta carotene, a precursor to vitamin A. Rice is a staple in many parts of the world, in fact, there are some people who get pretty much nothing else, day after day. Unfortunately, such a diet is lacking in quite a few essential nutrients, one of the most significant being vitamin A. A diet lacking in vitamin A can lead to blindness. Making this rice available in these poor countries could save the vision of millions of women and children, but it's a GMO, so should it never have been invented in the first place?
     
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  8. 1cock2hens

    1cock2hens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't believe it should exist, not at all. People did without before, they can now. Overpopulation is the real problem... But I'm a naturalist who strives to live in a 12 x 20 cabin in the middle of the woods, my way is not for everyone. So I will stay on my land away from the frankenrice happy knowing that the food I put into my body is the same food that nourished my parents and there parents and I don't have to worry about how these products are killing me.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2016

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