Goat behaviour when bred?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by RockyToggRanch, Oct 25, 2009.

  1. RockyToggRanch

    RockyToggRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 22, 2008
    Upstate NY
    I'm new to the goat world. I have recently allowed our buckling in with our does. I wanted to wait as late in the season as possible. It's been almost 2 weeks for the first doe and about a week for the 2nd (as far as I could tell by their heat signs and observance). I understand that I should leave them together for a month in case the first breeding did not take?

    My real question is....will a doe act differently when she is bred..early on?

    The buckling seems to have lost interest in the does and is rubbing the hind legs of my senior gelding ( who seems to appreciate to attention).

    I'll watch for signs of the girls going back into heat and then separate him from the afterward. Followed by a good scrubbing and de-stinking [​IMG]

    Newbie here..advice welcome:)
     
  2. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    Feb 27, 2008
    Elizabethtown, NC
    I've noticed that some does have a little change of personality. For example, a clingy cry-baby doe may become more standoffish. Or a standoffish doe may crave more attention as she gets closer to kidding.
     
  3. RockyToggRanch

    RockyToggRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 22, 2008
    Upstate NY
    What about early on? Mine is acting different..kind of relaxed.
     
  4. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    Feb 27, 2008
    Elizabethtown, NC
    Here ya go:

    "Early Pregnancy Signs
    Step 1:
    A sheep or goat that is pregnant will be calmer and have an increased appetite. After 12 weeks, the abdomen should begin to swell. This can be hard to notice in goats that already have round abdomens, so sometimes measuring the abdomen regularly after breeding can help. If, after 6 weeks, the diameter of the doe's abdomen has increased by more than an inch, she is probably pregnant.

    Check by Hand
    Step 1:
    The belly of a goat or sheep that is pregnant should feel different from that of one that is not. If pregnancy is suspected 6 weeks after breeding, gently poke the area in front of the udder with your fingers. A pregnant animal's belly will feel tighter (this technique takes some practice to develop). Later in the pregnancy, at around 3½ months, you should be able to feel fetal movement with your hands by pressing this area in front of the udder.

    Milk Production
    Step 1:
    If the ewe or doe is a milker, you will notice a sharp drop in milk production when the animal is pregnant. The udder may look flat, and milk may all but dry up. The udder will swell again in later stages of pregnancy (around 15 weeks) as the animal's body prepares to feed her young.

    Pregnancy Tests
    Step 1:
    If you're still not sure your animal is pregnant, there are blood and urine tests available to check. These tests should be given around 50 days gestation to be accurate, though your vet may have a test that can be given sooner. After 60 days gestation, an ultrasound can be performed on the animal to verify pregnancy. Ultrasounds are used more commonly on goats because their round abdomens make swelling hard to detect."

    http://www.answerbag.com/articles/S...or-Sheep/b6360dc6-3ac4-126e-157e-dd575338708d
     
  5. RockyToggRanch

    RockyToggRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 22, 2008
    Upstate NY
    Very helpful. thank you.

    Is it okay to worm the does at this point? They had their shot in the spring and the vet said it was all they need til next year. But I thought I might give them some pelleted wormer.
     

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