Goat eating wood.....

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Gatorpupsmom, Jan 3, 2009.

  1. Gatorpupsmom

    Gatorpupsmom Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 9, 2008
    Albany, Texas
    We are putting together a new goat shed (for our new goats.) Mary, our lovely Saanen, has decided that the 1 X 4 boards are quite tasty.

    Anyone know a quick remedy to keep a goat from eating almost 60 bucks worth of lumber? I am sure there are commercial preparations, but just wondering if anyone has a "home remedy" suggestion.......

    Thanks!!!!

    Kim
     
  2. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    What are you feeding her?? Does she have space to roam and browse?

    Is she cribbing or actually eating the wood? They love to tear up trees by peeling bark too.
     
  3. gapeachy

    gapeachy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 21, 2008
    Rome Ga
    ours eat the wires off our trailer 4wheeler and truck....goats are funny ....they will explore and chew on everything....we have not found anything to make them stop
     
  4. Chirpy

    Chirpy Balderdash

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    May 24, 2007
    Colorado
    I haven't had to deal with this ... yet. But my first suggestion would be to use something like Bitter Apple. It comes in a spray bottle from the pet store and is used very successfully to teach ferrets not to bite people. My vet also suggested it once to use on my dog so he wouldn't nibble on himself.

    It's very bitter, harmless and easy to use. I have no idea if it would work with goats but it would be worth the try.
     
  5. BeardedChick

    BeardedChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    For our wood gnawing horse, we used a hot spray at the feed store that's made to put on wood.

    What about cutting some brushy stuff and putting it in the pen for them, too?
     
  6. ksacres

    ksacres At Your Service

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    We haven't found anything that works, they just like to chew. I doubt that she does any real damage though.
     
  7. FarmGirl01

    FarmGirl01 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2008
    AR
    Ours ate the wood siding off of a small chicken barn. Started giving them branches and twiggs. Helped some. Good luck.
     
  8. buck-wild-chick

    buck-wild-chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 24, 2008
    Hamilton C. FL
    Maybe Spray the" bitter dog spray" on the wood.Not sure But the goat is probably just eating the wood,due to the tar on it.My goats love to eat new wood and pine tar.
     
  9. BeardedChick

    BeardedChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Does wrapping boards with chicken wire do any good to prevent chewing?
     
  10. Gatorpupsmom

    Gatorpupsmom Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 9, 2008
    Albany, Texas
    Quote:You were right, she took out a few bites, then went on to the next chewing project. You can tell she worked on it, but no real damage. I think she was just testing out the new wood, seeing how it rated against the other things she tried out today, like a paper sack that was holding the nails we used on the goat shed, and some bark from a mesquite tree, the garage, etc. Last week we put up new wood fence panels, and I was kinda surprised that she hasn't worked on them yet. Will look for some of the commercial products you guys mentioned, cause there may be some things that we don't want her eating (like the garage, for starters).

    She has plenty of hay, room to roam the yard, goat feed, minerals, and a goat friend....just about anything a goat could ask for. We are really going to have to watch what put out or leave around, because I put out fire ant killer around a mound in the yard, and she really wanted to munch on it, too. Had to scramble to get what I had put out covered....need to get more molasses and orange oil for future fire ant killing so won't have to worry about the silly goat.

    Thanks for suggestions,

    Kim
     

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