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Goat housing and dog housing together?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by E.M. Silkies, Sep 20, 2011.

  1. E.M. Silkies

    E.M. Silkies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2010
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    I posted this question on BYH too but I thought I'd ask here too just in case.

    So I have a large dog house for the Great Pyrenees that will be coming to live here next month and I'm also working on my goat house. Would I be better off to just build one structure for the goats and dog? Or will the dog want his own space? Also, if I have two different structures, how do I keep the goats from using the dog house instead of the goat house?

    Thanks!
     
  2. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 4, 2011
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    E.M. Silkies :

    I posted this question on BYH too but I thought I'd ask here too just in case.

    So I have a large dog house for the Great Pyrenees that will be coming to live here next month and I'm also working on my goat house. Would I be better off to just build one structure for the goats and dog? Or will the dog want his own space? Also, if I have two different structures, how do I keep the goats from using the dog house instead of the goat house?

    Thanks!

    Once the dog is bonded to the goats, he will probably sleep with them, wherever that is.
    You should have a separate place for the dog for a little while though, during the intro period. Are you getting an adult or a pup?​
     
  3. E.M. Silkies

    E.M. Silkies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2010
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    Quote:Once the dog is bonded to the goats, he will probably sleep with them, wherever that is.
    You should have a separate place for the dog for a little while though, during the intro period. Are you getting an adult or a pup?

    I am getting a pup.
     
  4. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, then you MUST have a separate pen for the pup for when you are not supervising. DO NOT leave a pup with livestock when you are not directly supervising the interactions. I do not care what the person selling you the dog says, pups are not to be trusted. Right now, momma dog is probably there to kick puppy butts when they get out of line. that will not be the case at your house. Pups dont mean to harm, but they play and it can turn bad. Also, a mean goat can ruin a working dog. Your goats also need to get used to dogs, or they may panic and cause the dog to chase them. I'd suggest a 6ft chain link run inside the goat pen, and one inside the barn, or a large crate in the barn for bedtime. That way they can see each other but not cause harm.
    A 3-4 ft high barn stall/pen is not going to be enough, btw. Six feet or enclosed. Otherwise, I can pretty well guarantee that pup will be loose soon!
     
  5. E.M. Silkies

    E.M. Silkies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2010
    Georgia
    We have a 6 ft. kennel that I'll plan to put inside. Thank you for the info. From what I understand, please correct me if I'm wrong, puppies want to play with the live stock and that's when they chase etc., and my goal is to teach the dog to submit to the animals. When he learns to submit to the goats is when he also learns to protect them correct? Also, how long do I keep him separated. I'll do introductions when I'm out there with them of course, but when is it ok to let him live with the herd unsupervised? Is that just a play it by ear thing? When I see that he is trustworthy?
     
  6. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,375
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    Jun 4, 2011
    Central Ohio
    E.M. Silkies :

    We have a 6 ft. kennel that I'll plan to put inside. Thank you for the info. From what I understand, please correct me if I'm wrong, puppies want to play with the live stock and that's when they chase etc., and my goal is to teach the dog to submit to the animals. When he learns to submit to the goats is when he also learns to protect them correct? Also, how long do I keep him separated. I'll do introductions when I'm out there with them of course, but when is it ok to let him live with the herd unsupervised? Is that just a play it by ear thing? When I see that he is trustworthy?

    It's not a "submit" thing, just a don't pounce on them thing. I'm not even sure what you mean by "submit to" the stock. If he is being 100% correct in his behavior, ie, no playing and chasing, try going out of sight and supervising. Then short times alone. If you have any flighty goats, you might want to take them out when progressing so they dont go fruity and encourage bad behvaior. Probably the earliest to start trusting him out of sight will be 6 mos. Then you may have a period of regression around 8-10 mos. It will be brief if you put an immediate end to it.
    Some may say this is longer than you need, more precaution than you need, but I'd rather not give a dog a chance to mess up than have to correct bad behaviors. Chasing and killing is hugely rewarding to a dog and a hard habit to break once they decide its fun.​
     
  7. E.M. Silkies

    E.M. Silkies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was reading that it's important to get the dog to submit, meaning if they act aggressive or playful, you make them lay down and roll on their backs(a sign of submission) to whatever animal it was acting out against. I know it's something you can do with a new dog in a family so they understand the pecking order but I think the point with this is to get the dog to know it can't be aggressive with the stock. I don't know....I've read lots of different things. I guess it's just going to be a matter of trying until I find what works best for this particular dog.
     
  8. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I do not believe the "alpha roll" is a good idea EVER. Unless you are certain you will be able to take on a 100lb dog who decides they dotn want you doing that, dont start. I have never had to do this with my dogs (anatolians). They are far more sensitive than people give them credit for. Start out spending time one on one with the pup, building a loving relationship. This means away from the stock, just you two. take the pup in with the goats on leash, and if the pup moves towards them in a "forward" fashion (ie ears perked, looks playful or mischevious), you just give a verbal "ehhh" growly noise. Pup stops, you say thank you. If the pup moves toward them calmly, ears back or relaxed, you praise calmly. This is exactly how an adult dog does it. They would not throw a pup on its back unless the pup did something so totally out of line as to deserve it. Save that for serious infractions, like actual jumping on and harming of stock.
    Having the pup bond to you some first is critical, otherwise they have no reason to look to you for direction.
     
  9. E.M. Silkies

    E.M. Silkies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great advice! Thank you so much. I wouldn't put him on his back, like you said, unless it was misbehavior worthy of such action. Honestly I don't think he'll do anything severe enough as an 8 week old to need that. I'm hoping too that I'll be a little ahead of the game because he is being raised with goats etc. Anyways, thank you for the feedback. I have some things to consider and construction to work on! [​IMG]
     
  10. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good, there is a lot of very old school and rough advice out there. If you need any other input, feel free to PM me or whatever.
     

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