Goat owners, please read.

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by miss heny, Mar 7, 2014.

  1. miss heny

    miss heny Genetic Expert in learning Premium Member

    As a goat owner we try to learn everything we can about how to care for our pets, breeders, and meat donors (blunt truth) but sometimes we are given the curve ball, and this post is about that.

    We are a small farm that are working on breeding dairy goats and showing them, and among our purebreds we have a small pet grade nigerian, the bottle baby pet that the family loves. She wasn't meant to be bred for some time but, goats are goats and when they are in heat and can find some way to a buck..Well she got bred. We found out shortly after and have been on pins and needles keeping our eyes on her.\

    Oh, 5 months later, giver or take one take we head out and her, ahem, lady part was sticking out like to ones business (Pics will come some of this, gotta get it off mom's phone.) and we first at thought it was a foot, but we were wrong, after having a goat friend who was staying over for the night check it out and stated she never seen it after 20 years of raising goats, Hearing that we called the vet, at first he called it a Prolapsed Servics (SP) he said to leave it be, that she would kid fine. But after a few days something just wasn't right and we (today) called the vet school, which luckily for us is about 1 hour away. He got a hold of the goat expert of the school, and were we in a shock.

    She was having a Prolapsed Vagina, something rarely, as if ever, heard in dairy goats, in fact it was more common in meat goats. Both us and our vet learn something new. Because of how it was it was preventing her to kid, thankfully the goat person told us how to take care of it, by putting in a stitches in a criss cross pattern and tied loosely like you would with shoes. Now we are waiting for her to finally kid.

    With any goat that has this, it is best to either cull, never breed, or (in our case) fix them. I hope those on BYC never have to deal with this heart wrenching moment, but at least learn this info just in case.

    miss heny of Fairy Fart Farm.
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: She was bred too young, and this is a prime example of why this is generally avoided. Prolapses are especially common under such circumstances. Especially if she bred to a larger goat, i.e. a full size one. So in this case I wouldn't blame the animal or its genetics. If she was a full adult and this happened then I'd look askance at her, but also at her diet. Birthing problems are more common on some diets than others. I assume you guys know what you're doing, since you are show-breeders, but I will ask anyway, just in case: she's not on a dairy goat's rations, is she?

    Goats are tough little things, with good care it's entirely possible she could survive to kid normally next time. Raspberry leaves, dried or raw, will tone up her reproductive system and greatly increase the chances of a smooth delivery, and greatly lessen the chances of this ever happening again. I use raspberry leaves with my animals of various species for various reasons, but generally for birthing animals and post-birth animals it can't be beaten. But don't feed it to her while she's not in labor, or it could induce labor.

    Hope she makes it. Best wishes.
     
  3. miss heny

    miss heny Genetic Expert in learning Premium Member

    She got bred at one year of age, but we didn't want her bred for quite a time yet.
     
  4. miss heny

    miss heny Genetic Expert in learning Premium Member

    Also the buck she got bred to is a very, very small large bred goat.
     
  5. cassie

    cassie Overrun With Chickens

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    A prolapsed vagina is not common in dairy goats, but it isn't exactly rare either. I have seen it in older fat does.
     
  6. miss heny

    miss heny Genetic Expert in learning Premium Member

    around here our vet school person only seen it twice in her whole career something for us sorta scared us. though other areas kight have it happen more it is not heard of down here.
     
  7. cassie

    cassie Overrun With Chickens

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    I don't think it is the area so much as the numbers of animals involved. The greater the number of individuals of any species you see, the more wierd and unusual things you are going to see, too. I just happened to live in an area where there were a large number of commercial goat dairies with large numbers of animals. I milked 100 does myself and that was one of the smaller dairies. Laurewood Acres was not far from me and they milked over 1000.
     

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