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goat people - when is she going to kid? (pics)

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by mamabird, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. mamabird

    mamabird Chillin' With My Peeps

    283
    1
    149
    Apr 14, 2007
    App. Mtn's
    Don't know when this doe was bred. She is really sunken in at her tailhead, still feel ligaments, noticed a very small handfull of an udder starting in late Dec. - progressively getting larger, not posty, still eating, no discharge. I'm sure she is bred because I feel baby moving. This is her first freshening. When do YOU think she will kid??

    Taken today...she's standing, facing uphill
    [​IMG]

    Taken today...
    [​IMG]

    Taken on 2/29/09
    [​IMG]

    Taken today... She does not like her pooch picture taken [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    Her udder looks like it's doubled from the first picture. LOL best I can tell you is soon...once those ligs disappear. Is her udder tight yet?

    I always say you never know til they're pushing. I was totally wrong about FlightsofFancy's doe, who still had a bit of one lig last night and kidded this morning (I thought she still had a couple days!). I have two Nigi does in the barn whos ligs will be gone, then come back 12 hrs later. They're toying with me!
     
  3. mamabird

    mamabird Chillin' With My Peeps

    283
    1
    149
    Apr 14, 2007
    App. Mtn's
    Helmstead - Saw your newbies! They are adorable!!!

    Udder isn't tight yet, but it's more firm than yesterday. When I feel for ligs, they are the only thing that is left around her tailhead. I assume I am feeling ligs - pencil-ish size that go down to pin bones. Is there always a discharge before kidding? What is the time frame? I check her 2-3 x a day, and can see her from the house. I'm being obsessive about this, but I am just so afraid that I am going to miss something and have this end badly.

    I have helped with a lot of births, on a lot of different animals, but goats are a first. I've read, and read, and read some more - on all of the sites that are recommended, but will be much more confident when this kidding is under my belt.
     
  4. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

    5,545
    223
    288
    Mar 31, 2008
    Grifton NC
    I've been breeding sheep for about 5 years now, and I've found it's almost IMPOSSIBLE to predict when they will give birth.
    There are just too many variables
     
  5. ksacres

    ksacres At Your Service

    Nov 16, 2007
    San Antonio TX
    Quote:Ditto. Have you ever heard of the "Doe's code of Honor"?

    The Doe's Secret Code of Honor


    The doe's secret code of honor is as old as goats themselves and is ultimately the species best kept secret. No doe shall ever kid before its time. (Its time being determined by the following factors):

    1- No kid shall be born until total chaos has been reached by all involved. Your owner's house must be a wreck, their
    family hungry and desperate for clean clothes, and their social life nonexistent.

    2- "Midwives" must reach the babbling fool status before you kid out.Bloodshot eyes, tangled hair and the inability to
    form a sentence mean the time is getting close.

    3- For every bell, beeper, camera or whistle they attach

    to you, kidding must be delayed by at least one day for each an audio monitor, one good yell per hour will keep things interesting.

    4- If you hear the words, "She's nowhere near ready.

    She'll be fine while we're away for the weekend," Wait until they load the car, then begin pushing!



    5- Owner stress must be at an all time high! If you are in the care of someone else, ten to fifteen phone calls a day is a sign you're getting close.

    6- When you hear the words "I can't take it anymore!"
    wait at least three more days.

    7 -You must keep this waiting game interesting. False
    alarms are mandatory! Little teasers such as looking at your
    stomach, pushing your food around in the bucket and then walking away from it, and nesting, are always good for a rise. Be creative and find new things to do to keep the adrenaline pumping in those who wait.

    8- The honor of all goats is now in your hands. Use this time to avenge all of your barn mates. Think about your friend who had to wear that silly costume in front of those people. Hang onto that baby for another day. OH, they made him do tricks too! Three more days seems fair. Late feedings, the dreaded diet, bad haircuts, those awful wormings can also be avenged at this time.

    9- If you have fulfilled all of the above and are still not sure when to have the kids, listen to the weather forecast on
    the radio that has been so generously provided by those who wait. Severe storm warning is what you're waiting for. In the heart of the storm jump into action! The power could go out and you could have the last laugh. You have a good chance of those who wait missing the whole thing while searching
    for a flashlight that works!

    10- Make the most of your interrupted nights. Beg for food each time someone comes into the barn to check you. Your barn mates will love you as the extra goodies fall their way too.
    Remember, this code of honor was designed to remind
    man of how truly special goats are. Do your best to reward those who wait with a beautiful doeling to carry on the Doe Code of Honor for the next generation of those who wait!​
     
  6. mamabird

    mamabird Chillin' With My Peeps

    283
    1
    149
    Apr 14, 2007
    App. Mtn's
    Nope - never saw this before...but I'm sure my doe has! [​IMG]
     
  7. ksacres

    ksacres At Your Service

    Nov 16, 2007
    San Antonio TX
    Quote:[​IMG]
     
  8. hollyk

    hollyk Chillin' With My Peeps

    367
    0
    131
    Nov 21, 2008
    Canton, Texas
    Quote:Ditto. Have you ever heard of the "Doe's code of Honor"?

    The Doe's Secret Code of Honor


    The doe's secret code of honor is as old as goats themselves and is ultimately the species best kept secret. No doe shall ever kid before its time. (Its time being determined by the following factors):

    1- No kid shall be born until total chaos has been reached by all involved. Your owner's house must be a wreck, their
    family hungry and desperate for clean clothes, and their social life nonexistent.

    2- "Midwives" must reach the babbling fool status before you kid out.Bloodshot eyes, tangled hair and the inability to
    form a sentence mean the time is getting close.

    3- For every bell, beeper, camera or whistle they attach

    to you, kidding must be delayed by at least one day for each an audio monitor, one good yell per hour will keep things interesting.

    4- If you hear the words, "She's nowhere near ready.

    She'll be fine while we're away for the weekend," Wait until they load the car, then begin pushing!



    5- Owner stress must be at an all time high! If you are in the care of someone else, ten to fifteen phone calls a day is a sign you're getting close.

    6- When you hear the words "I can't take it anymore!"
    wait at least three more days.

    7 -You must keep this waiting game interesting. False
    alarms are mandatory! Little teasers such as looking at your
    stomach, pushing your food around in the bucket and then walking away from it, and nesting, are always good for a rise. Be creative and find new things to do to keep the adrenaline pumping in those who wait.

    8- The honor of all goats is now in your hands. Use this time to avenge all of your barn mates. Think about your friend who had to wear that silly costume in front of those people. Hang onto that baby for another day. OH, they made him do tricks too! Three more days seems fair. Late feedings, the dreaded diet, bad haircuts, those awful wormings can also be avenged at this time.

    9- If you have fulfilled all of the above and are still not sure when to have the kids, listen to the weather forecast on
    the radio that has been so generously provided by those who wait. Severe storm warning is what you're waiting for. In the heart of the storm jump into action! The power could go out and you could have the last laugh. You have a good chance of those who wait missing the whole thing while searching
    for a flashlight that works!

    10- Make the most of your interrupted nights. Beg for food each time someone comes into the barn to check you. Your barn mates will love you as the extra goodies fall their way too.
    Remember, this code of honor was designed to remind
    man of how truly special goats are. Do your best to reward those who wait with a beautiful doeling to carry on the Doe Code of Honor for the next generation of those who wait!

    [​IMG]I am so certain my does have passed this around!
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2009
  9. ametauss

    ametauss Chillin' With My Peeps

    664
    1
    141
    Aug 20, 2008
    Shepherdsville, KY
    I think my does have the doe code down to perfection.... false labor is their speciality.... they get swollen one day and then nothing the next.... I can't see how their udders can get any fuller.... small amount of dripping from their rears but no mucus plug to speak of.... keeping us on our toes ALL the time...

    [​IMG]
     
  10. mamabird

    mamabird Chillin' With My Peeps

    283
    1
    149
    Apr 14, 2007
    App. Mtn's
    About a birthing area...I have a very small shed in my goat pen that I can lock her in. It is a 4 x 6' and has 4 sides with a small door for the goats to get in and out of. We have a wooden baby gate mounted across the door so we can lock her in and the others out (we also have 2 large doghouses in the pen). I locked her in after dinner, and checked on her later. She still had ligs, but seemed to be stressing because she was away from the other goats. She could still see them, but was clearly not happy about being in there. The plan would be to put her in there at night, and let her out some, during the day. I can clearly see and hear her from the house. I could put her in the empty side of the chicken coop, she would be in an enclosed building, but be far away from the herd. We also have a large horse barn, but it is a long way from the house and we have coyotes, so I'm afraid to put her in a stall up there (open doorway) for fear that something would get after her and I wouldn't know it. Do you think she far enough along to start penning her up? Suggestions/recommendations? Anyone else out there literally dreaming of goats???
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2009

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