Goat Sore Mouth...?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Rebel Cowgirl, Feb 25, 2016.

  1. Rebel Cowgirl

    Rebel Cowgirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 21, 2016
    So I think that my buckling and a few of my does have sore mouth... I know it's highly contagious and that it basically has to run its course. I also know that they are immune to it a little while after they get it and that I can get it. My question is: Even after a goat is completely healed of sore mouth and there is no sign of it, can they still give the virus to other goats and do they pass it to their kids? How long should I keep my herd closed off? I don't know how the buckling got it. He gave it to two of my does, though. Is there anything I can give them to help them out?
     
  2. cassie

    cassie Overrun With Chickens

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    I suggest you vaccinate the herd. Also, if you vaccinate a goat that is exhibiting symptoms, it will shorten the course of the disease.
     
  3. Rebel Cowgirl

    Rebel Cowgirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks. Will my pregnant does' kids get it when they're born because it is in my pasture now?
     
  4. cassie

    cassie Overrun With Chickens

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    I don't know. If I were you I would just vaccinate the whole herd now and be done with it. If you vaccinate the does that should impart some immunity to the kids. I started vaccinating after the year I had a soremouth outbreak just before a big show. The infection came from some alfalfa hay that had been sheeped off the year before. Vaccinating for soremouth saved me a lot of headaches. The vaccine is cheap and easy to administer. Be aware that it is a live vaccine so take care. You might want to wear gloves when you vaccinate in case you have a cut on your hand. Be careful when treating your animals that have an active case of soremouth. If you have a break in the skin on your hand and it comes in contact with a scab you may get soremouth on your hand. It isn't serious, but it is painful.
     
  5. rosti

    rosti Out Of The Brooder

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    I don't vaccinate-when they get it, I just give high doses of Vit. C and it cures it.
     
  6. cassie

    cassie Overrun With Chickens

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    Just a comment. If you vaccinated for it you wouldn't have to deal with it in the first place. You pays your money and you takes your choice.
     
  7. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    Here's a good website with info about Orf:

    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/i...s_ecthyma/overview_of_contagious_ecthyma.html

    After the scabs are gone, the goats should no longer be carrying the virus. At this point they are immune to further Orf infection.

    Be careful using the live virus vaccine in pregnant does. I would wait until the kids are old enough, then vaccinate them as well. be sure to keep vaccinated animals separate from unvaccinated animals (non infected animals) unless all sores and scabs have healed (about 3-4 weeks). The vaccine basically infects the goats with the virus in areas that are less likely to cause issues (axilla, groin, underside of tail) Do not vaccinate a nursing doe in the groin, however, as it can infect the youngsters and lesions may spread to the teats.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2016
  8. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    Also, the herd should stay closed until at least four weeks after the last goat has shown signs of infection.
     
  9. cassie

    cassie Overrun With Chickens

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    Just a comment. The vaccine I used said to vaccinate under the tail. You were to abrade a small area on the underside of the tail and apply the vaccine to that spot. I don't know why you would want to vaccinate in the groin or anyplace else. If nursing kids get soremouth and their mothers are not immune, they can spread the soremouth to the teats. I have seen this happen and it isn't pretty.
     
  10. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    Some people prefer the other two areas for whatever reason. All three are easy to check and usually don't cause issues, except as I mentioned in nursing does.
     

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