1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Goat with Horns - Should I get it?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by ThreeBoysChicks, Apr 15, 2008.

  1. ThreeBoysChicks

    ThreeBoysChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Thurmont, MD
    Asking all you experienced Goat people.....

    I went a looked at a couple of boys that will eventually be wethered. They are 2 months old, but they have their horns. What do you think? Should I consider them? They would pets, not dinner. Should I worry about the horns? Is it too late to remove their horns?

    Tell me, for your wethers, did you or do you dehorn? If not, have you had any issues with them having horns?

    Thanks!
    Ed
     
  2. 1acrefarm

    1acrefarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 3, 2007
    Georgia
    I have never had issues with horns but some do. They can get hung in certain types of fencing but my goats are either contained with a rope or chain link fencing. If you feel your goats horns are a threat and don't mind them looking silly you can glue tennis balls on the end of them. Never done it only saw it so don't know what glue to use. Wethers should not be aggressive anyway. Some would not have a goat with horns I would never dehorn them or buy a dehorned one.
     
  3. augiedranch

    augiedranch Chillin' With My Peeps

    750
    3
    168
    Mar 14, 2008
    Texas
    i believe in disbudding. but not dehorning.

    i have raised goats since the eigth grade. i have had some that were born polled, but most of them had/have horns. poco, the goat pictured here is a 210 pound wether boer goat. the friendliest thing ever. horns are beautiful and unique with every different goat. i wouldnt dehorn at two months old. however, i do this and so could u. tip the horns. (take an inch or two off the top and then file it down.) some people argue that horns get caught in fences and are dangerous with other goats. i havent had any problems with this at all.

    just make sure that u dont let the little guys push or butt you. it may be cute now, but it wont be when they get bigger!

    prob should castrate them pretty soon though! hope this helps
     
  4. augiedranch

    augiedranch Chillin' With My Peeps

    750
    3
    168
    Mar 14, 2008
    Texas
    opps i forgot to put a pic lol! [​IMG]

    picture of poco the boar goat. and my blue eyed lamancha gus.
    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
     
  5. kstaven

    kstaven Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    5,928
    43
    293
    Jan 26, 2007
    BC, Washington Border
    I never have goats disbudded and have never had a problem. Never use the horns to grab them and they are fine. 8 weeks is perfect age to turn them to wethers.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    Because we don't believe disbudding is a humane practice, all of our goats that were born with horns get to keep them. Of the many goats we've owned, only one has ever intentionally horned us (a buck we purchased from a petting farm named Oreo, who would use his horns to prod you for food and who was sold after two months of ownership for doing so to two people). A well tamed goat who has been taught boundaries isn't going to horn you, simple as that.

    I think horns are beautiful. They use them as tools - like a built in back scratcher ;-). We knew ahead of time to plan for horned goats and chose fencing they wouldn't get stuck in.

    We're working on a polled breeding program for customers who prefer hornless goats.
     
  7. ThreeBoysChicks

    ThreeBoysChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Thurmont, MD
    Thanks to everyone for their responses. I have never been around many goats who had their horms, so I didn't have experience with them. The one I am really interested in, is a Blue / Black boy and is very nice looking. His mother is a large dairy goat (not purebred). The man wants $50.

    Next question, I can get him now (2 months) and I can get another from a neighbor, but her's were just born last week. Will Boy #1 be OK by himself until the second one is old enough to leave his mom?

    Also Boy #1 has not really been played with a lot. He was not mean, but did not run right up to us either. At 2 months, is it too late? Or will he still get tame with lots of love and attention?

    Thanks again!
     
  8. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    A customer of mine purchased a doeling from me back in February. They didn't have any other goats and we didn't have any others for sale.

    They kept the doeling as if she were a dog - she came in the house when they were home and everything. They purchased the next born doeling we had, who just weaned last week. Their doeling did great in the interim - but you have to realize they spent a LOT of time with her. Now that they have two, they can actually go on a vacation, LOL.

    Most of our goats were purchased as wild goats. Practically no one around us bothers to tame them. It takes time, but they DO come around. Individuals vary, of course...and the younger they are the better they come around. At two months, I'd say you're golden. Typically my dam raised kids aren't as friendly as a bottle baby, but as soon as they wean they become pocket pets.
     
  9. ThreeBoysChicks

    ThreeBoysChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Thurmont, MD
    Thanks Kate! I have read your posts and do greatly respect your opinion. I think I am going to tell them I will take him.

    --Ed
     
  10. augiedranch

    augiedranch Chillin' With My Peeps

    750
    3
    168
    Mar 14, 2008
    Texas
    Quote:when i purchased "older goats" who were not tamed yet. i put them in a smaller area away from the others. and got him/her use to lots of love and treats! the goat after about a week was loving attention, people, and food! i put them in a small area only because it was easier to play, pet, sctratch, and tame it so it wouldnt take forever for me to catch it, and running after a goat thats already scared of you makes it alot worse for the goat!

    incase u were wondering the difference between disbudding and dehorning.

    disbudding is done when they are still VERY young. and it kinda burns a little ring around the horn and it pops right off.. i do not do that, but the vet i work for will do it for owners who really want it done. to make a better/safer pet... (i like the horns) however DEHORNING a goat i believe is very cruel. it messes with the goats sinus's and eye ducts. it actually removes the skull over the brain! i have never had any of mine dehorned. (inless they were born polled-no horns)

    sometimes the horns get pointy at the ends and it could accidently hurt or poke u so i just tip them. they dont feel it, its like cutting ur finger nails. i DO NOT go to t he quick. i just barely take the tip off. besides, when i sold boer goats for ffa and 4h shows they had to either be dehorned or tipped. and i told the suspecting buyers that i wouldnt sell the goat to them if they were going to dehorn it. but i told them id tip and castrate them for them.

    on the goats above they have been tipped. see how rounded the ends are?

    ur goat will be fine to wait for the other new baby. just give him lots of attention. goats are herd animals. but this might be a good chance to tame him up!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by