Goats fighting?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Countrymama719, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. Countrymama719

    Countrymama719 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 20, 2011
    Fort Wayne, In
    I've had my nubians for almost a year now, a mama and her weather. They've always gotten along great, she's seriously mother of the year. Although he's just about bigger than her, she still sleeps him between her and the wall for protection and at almost 9 months old I caught her letting him nurse. Anyways I walked back to the pasture today and caught them going at it. At first I thought it was play but when they didn't stop when I walked up I realized they were full on fighting. You could hear their skulls cracking against each other. [​IMG] I broke them up but now I'm concerned, should they be separated for a while, or is this just normal goat behavior??
     
  2. WildRoseBeef

    WildRoseBeef Out Of The Brooder

    Is the "mama" close to kidding at all? I'm thinking it could be hormones that are making her get into a bit of a disagreement with the wether...I assume the wether's her offspring?
     
  3. Countrymama719

    Countrymama719 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 20, 2011
    Fort Wayne, In
    No she's not, we didn't freshen her this year, and ya he is. I guess I did a little reading and it's to establish dominance. maybe he's trying to show his dominance over her since he's getting older and bigger than her. I have no clue. I'm still pretty new to all this, and it was so odd to see them fight.
     
  4. Kaitie09

    Kaitie09 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh, I had the same thing happen here. My pygmy was dominate, and when my Boer hit 2 years old, she started chasing and butting the pygmy. The pygmy sounded like she was screaming for dear life, so we did separate her into a kennel for a few hours. After a couple days, all was quiet and it was evident that my Boer took over. It was for the best though because the pygmy was nasty and pushy.
     
  5. Skyesrocket

    Skyesrocket Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 20, 2008
    I just noticed that going on in my Nigerian herd this week. A Nanny that has never showed any dominance has been side butting and cracking heads with her yearling daughter. It could be herd dynamics or it could be the mommas telling the babies that the free ride is over. Like telling a teenager it's time for them to earn their own gas money...lol.
     
  6. Countrymama719

    Countrymama719 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 20, 2011
    Fort Wayne, In
    haha Love it!
     
  7. duckduckgoose 2

    duckduckgoose 2 New Egg

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    Sep 11, 2016
    Hi I am new and don't know how to post my own so I was hoping someone could help I have a Billy and a doeling and a pygmy nanny the Billy and doeling are Susana (Sorry if I spelt that rough) he is 11 months and she is 9 months the 2 girls are together and the Billy is on his own can I put him in with the does for winter for more body heat over the winter or will he breed them and if not can I get a other Billy or weather for him as a friend and more heat
     
  8. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    Mar 5, 2007
    Phoenix, AZ
    Welcome to BYC!

    If you put him with the does, he will definitely try to breed them. It's good that they are separated now! A goat friend would be a great idea for him and a wether would be perfect since they would be less likely to fight than two bucks.
     
  9. Gray Farms

    Gray Farms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Its best to let them settle it themselves.
     
  10. Gray Farms

    Gray Farms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    NW Missouri
    If you don't want them bred then don't put them together because he will breed them. If you want him to have a buddy for warmth find a wether, not a billy they'll fight a lot.
     

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