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Goats or Cows?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Flyboy718, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. Flyboy718

    Flyboy718 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We have 11 acres of which about 5 would be suitable for either type of livestock...this will be our first rodeo and we are looking for a supply of milk for a family of 5 and some meat. The cost of fencing is a huge issue and we need to know what we would need to get and how much it cost for cow or goat. Also, what would be the cheapest on feed and incidentals?
     
  2. mama24

    mama24 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm starting to think it would have been easier to get cattle than my goats They get into everything and destroy everything! But I still love them! Good luck!
     
  3. Flyboy718

    Flyboy718 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks! Anybody else have any input?
     
  4. mlm Mike

    mlm Mike Sunna and Mani

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    We like having goats. Goat milk is naturally homagonized. A dairy cow will give a lot more milk. They are both herd animals, so you may need two. When you say for milk and meat, are you talking about raising the offspring for slaughter? There are some dual purpose cows. Goats are cheaper to keep. My wife grew up on a (cow) dairy farm, we raise dairy goats for our milk.
     
  5. Flyboy718

    Flyboy718 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dairy goats are deffinately an option, but would we have to have some meat goats separte for meat? What about fencing, I would think that it would be very expensive...how much room would we need for say six goats?
     
  6. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    A lot of people mix a nubian doe with a boer buck. The doe is then milked when she kids, and the kids are raised for slaughter. The idea is, is that most dairy breeds are pretty lean, so even extra males tend to not have much meat on their frames. So, the boer blood helps flesh them out.
     
  7. mlm Mike

    mlm Mike Sunna and Mani

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    Yes,fencing can get expensive. We actually have a small herd of Nigerian Dwarf Goats, but we only care about the milk.
    If you're looking at only raising one type of livestock for meat and milk I'd research a dual purpose cow, Brown Swiss or Milking Shorthorn.

    I'm not certain how much space a full size goat needs, for our dwarfs we use 10 square feet per goat for barn and barnyard space. We also pasture the ones not in milk,they really don't like venturing far from their barn. We also use Temporary electric fencing to breakup the pasture,keep them wlking a certain area.
     
  8. mlm Mike

    mlm Mike Sunna and Mani

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    Thanks Stacykins, I wasn't sure if that was done with goats, I know it's done with cows.
     
  9. sunny & the 5 egg layers

    sunny & the 5 egg layers Overrun With Chickens

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    Maybe you should look into Kinder Goats? They are a dual purpose goat. They are a mix of a Nubian Doe and a Pygmy buck. Here is a nice website about Kinders: http://www.kindergoats.org/

    I do not know much about cows. Maybe you should check out BYC's sister site, backyardherds if you haven't already. Here is a link: www.backyardherds.com
    Take Care Now,
    Sunny & the 5 egg layers
     
  10. Flyboy718

    Flyboy718 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We may just start with a buck and doe milking goat and a buck and doe meat goat? I also thought about a pig or two for meat and just use the goats for milk.
     

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