Goats (pictures, stories, tips, etc.)

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by KDOGG331, Aug 25, 2016.

  1. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    So I've made a few threads on goats before because I've thought about getting them but this one is different. I don't really have any questions but more just want pictures, stories, tips, etc. About goats. I don't know if I'll ever get them, at least not for a few years, but I sure do love them so please share your goats and anything else you think is relevant! And maybe one question: I've heard that LaManchas can be brats/pushy/loud and aren't necessarily good first goats and that Nubians can be loud. Anyone have either and can prove or disprove this? Also, sorry, one more question, if I wanted them for, say, brush clearing, is it true that dwarfs/pygmies don't eat as much and Boers eat tons? Anyways, thanks in advance and can't wait to hear all about the goats. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2016
  2. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    I know it's late but anyone? :)
     
  3. LRH97

    LRH97 Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    Here are my two boys! This is Otis (right) and Oscar (left), both Nigerian Dwarf wethers. These are the only two goats I've had myself, so I'm still learning as I go. My grandparents and great grandparents always kept a few dairy goats but I never really got involved with them. My two are incredibly easy to care for, and I spend more time in the way of house keeping work with the chickens. Most of the time spent with the goats is socializing. The basic housekeeping (cleaning house, refilling feed and water etc.) just isn't as time consuming as with the birds. I've never had LaManchas, so I couldn't help you there. However, if Boers, being a meat breed, are anything like meat breed chickens, I'd think they'd eat quite a bit to gain that muscle mass. Goats are browsers though, not grazers. So you'd probably need a few more than two to put a dent in some brush!

    [​IMG]
     
  4. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    Your two are so cute!! Thanks for sharing! And hmm, that's true. Probably require more hay or feed too, unless of course I had tons of brush for them to eat. The dwarfs seem adorable. And of course we've lasted this long with the brush, it probably wouldn't matter if they were slow clearing it lol I have noticed that the birds do seem to take a while to maintain so that'd be nice if the goats took less time. I'm assuming yours are pets? They're adorable!!
     
  5. LRH97

    LRH97 Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    Thanks! Yep they're my "kids". They're wonderful pets. They remind me of dogs with hooves. [​IMG] Of course, if you have a big herd of goats I'm sure they'd take more time to maintain. But like I said, my two little guys keep it pretty simple for me. Mine love getting to come out of their fence (supervised, of course) to eat the weeds that come through the cracks of the concrete in the driveway...oh and one of my mom's flowering bushes. They really like that bush. [​IMG] Mom's less than appreciative. It may take a little longer with just a few to clear a big area of brush, but they'll love doing it for you. Even with a couple they're great "weedeaters"!
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2016
  6. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    Sorry, forgot to reply haha but wow that's awesome! I have heard they're somewhat like dogs :)

    Is there any way to fence off that flower?

    I was thinking of taking mine out for walks and things if I get them. I'm sure they'd probably like it.
     
  7. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    Just thought of this question: if I wanted to take them on walks, what's best, collar and lead or halter and lead? I've heard collar? But am not entirely clear on why a halter is bad for walking them?

    And I know more of you have goats haha
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2016
  8. LRH97

    LRH97 Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    I've been meaning to leash train mine but haven't gotten around to it yet. I have heard either one, but if/when I get around to it I'll probably use a collar. Just seems more comfortable for them. :)
     
  9. waddles99

    waddles99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lead training serves no purpose other than if you need to move them around between pastures, to the barn, milking stand, etc.

    If you want to take an animal on walks, I hear dogs are great for that.

    If you must, start them off on a halter so you have more mobility over them. Use a bucket of cracked corn or some treat to get them to move. No matter how frustrated you get, don't hit them or smack them. It will only make them less agreeable. When you can get them to move alright, transition over to the collar. Gradually wean them off of any treats. Keep working with them, don't let them stop, let them know you are in control. They will never walk perfectly, as it is not in a goat's nature to, but at least you can get them to move.
     
  10. res

    res Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ours are all leash trained, and I VASTLY prefer a collar over a halter. Halters on goats and sheep never want to "stay" and always seem to rotate and rub eyes when you are trying to keep control.

    Leash training is easiest with multiple goats being walked at the same time. I know it sounds crazy, but goats have a HUGE "monkey see - monkey do" herd mentality. If you get ONE walking, the rest will follow. Heck, we don't even leash all of ours when we walk them. If we have 1 or 2 leashed, the rest just follow along as we walk down the PRIVATE road. I wouldn't walk like this on a public road!
     

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